A college student in central China recently broached two topics deemed sensitive by the Chinese communist regime—he supports a democratic republic and is critical of Mao Zedong—and was soon hauled away for psychiatric treatment.
“I wrote about my faith in the Republic of China; I advocated a unified China under a republic, and the return of democracy. I also wrote that Mao Zedong is the greatest butcher, and expressed other opinions along those lines,” said Lao Yeli to New Tang Dynasty Television (NTD), a New York based Chinese language broadcaster that is part of the Epoch Media Group. “Someone then took a screenshot of my remarks and reported me to the school administration,” he added.
Wholly unamused with their student’s political declarations and his refusal to retract them, the school officials at an unnamed university in Wuhan that the 22-year-old Lao was attending checked him into a mental hospital on March 25 on grounds that he had “personality defects and held extremist ideas.”
Lao told NTD on March 28, while still detained in the psychiatric hospital,that he had aired his opinions on his school’s Tencent QQ microblog. Some Internet users (Lao believes they were paid regime commentators) asked why he had used the flag of Taiwan—the so-called “Blue Sky, White Sun, Red Earth” design—as his microblog display picture.
Taiwan, an island in the South China Sea, is officially known as the Republic of China; the Republic of China is also the state of China from 1919 to 1949. The democratic government of Taiwan and the Chinese communist regime observes the so-called 1992 Consensus, or the understanding that there is one China, and that both governments have a claim to it.
Wishing for mainland China to be democratic, however, is mentally unsound behavior, at least by the reaction of Lao Yeli’s college.
In an interview with Radio Free Asia, Lao said that he had “only accepted two treatments” at the mental hospital, “a standardized physical therapy and a foot therapy,” indicating that he does not appear to have been subject to psychiatric torture, as often takes place in the case of political enemies who are locked in psychiatric detention facilities.
“The hospital originally insisted that I take medications and injections, but I rejected them,” Lao said. He added that he would be discharged from on March 29.
Chen Yongming, a scholar of the Chinese constitution, told NTD that the Chinese regime has been confining college students who espouse democratic ideals to mental institutions since the 1980s, along with “many democracy activists.”
“The Chinese regime adopts this practice to ruin a person’s reputation—others would think that the democracy advocate is mentally challenged, and this would cause society at large to alienate them,” Chen said.
In the early years of the campaign to persecute the Falun Gong spiritual practice, psychiatric torture was also widely used. After intense international attention and pressure, including meticulous documentation of the abuses being conducted, the practice was largely abandoned (though Falun Gong adherents are still detained and tortured in large numbers using conventional means).

Lao doesn’t bear any ill feelings toward the parties who informed on him, but regrets his temporary incarceration.
“To tell the truth, nothing would happen if the person had reported me to the police. There are many in China who say similar things; if arrests were made, half of the Chinese population would be sitting in jail,” Lao told NTD. “Since the school was involved, however they summoned my parents over, and confined me in a mental institution, where I’ve lost my freedom.”
He added: “I guess I’ll be released tomorrow.”

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News Analysis
The U.S. Navy recently sent a carrier strike group to the South China Sea. It was intended as a new show of force against China’s recent efforts to weaponize islands in the region with anti-air missiles, jets, and other systems.
Chinese military hawks are calling for more drastic actions against U.S. freedom of navigation operations—even urging them to ram or fire warning shots at U.S. ships. The Pentagon, meanwhile, is trying to get other countries including India and Australia to also send warships to challenge China’s territorial claims.
According to Steven Mosher, president of the Population Research Institute and a former U.S. Navy officer, the importance of what’s happening in the South China Sea cannot be understated—and while the United States is taking steps in the right direction, it needs to up the ante in the region if it’s going to dissuade the Chinese regime from its ultimate goal.
The U.S. Navy needs to form a coalition, Mosher said. And instead of just sending one U.S. Navy ship here and there to challenge China’s territorial claims, it needs to gather its allies to create a multi-nation flotilla.
The United States needs to gather its allies to create a multi-nation flotilla.

“I think that would help to forestall any aggressive actions on the part of China,” Mosher said in a phone interview, noting it could also serve as the “basis of an Asia treaty organization” similar to NATO.
If this strategy were used soon, he said, it “could bring China to the negotiating table.”
Mosher proposed his strategy during an event at the Naval Sea Systems Command (NAVSEA) Headquarters in Washington in late February, and his plan is well grounded.
Multiple Fronts
The reality is that the Chinese regime is fighting for control of the South China Sea on multiple fronts. It uses its military to press forward, seize territory, and build defenses. But the main tools it uses to ward off other nations are its manipulation of the legal system, and its use of propaganda.
And its main tools for propaganda are its criticisms of the United States as an aggressor and a hegemon.
Mosher said the U.S. Navy needs to avoid turning China’s attempted takeover of the South China Sea into a conflict between the United States and China. He said the Chinese regime would simply use its propaganda to fire back about U.S. interests.
China bullies countries when it feels at a position of strength, but it kowtows when it’s too weak.— Steven Mosher

When facing off against other nations, such as Vietnam and the Philippines, the Chinese strategy is based on intimidation.
“We would have seen bloody clashes in the South China Sea already, were it not for the presence of the United States,” he said.
If the United States were to unite the efforts of other countries under one banner to counter China, he said, it could defeat the Chinese regime’s strategy on two key levels: Its efforts to frame the United States as an aggressor would be empty, and its efforts to intimidate other nations would be of little use.
“China bullies countries when it feels at a position of strength, but it kowtows when it’s too weak,” Mosher said.
Plans for Domination
Mosher also warned that China’s ambitions go far beyond the South China Sea. The ultimate goal of the Chinese Communist Party (CCP), he said, is to replace the United States as the world leader.
The CCP’s goal has become more public in recent years. Michael Pillsbury, a leading adviser to the Pentagon and director of the Center for Chinese Strategy at the Hudson Institute, detailed the CCP’s ambitions and strategy in his 2005 book, “The Hundred-Year Marathon: China’s Secret Strategy to Replace America as the Global Superpower.”
A new world under the CCP’s rule that ‘values order over freedom, ethics over law, and elite governance over democracy and human rights.’

Pillsbury explains this has been the CCP’s goal since its founding years under Mao Zedong, and while it used to keep this goal under a veil of secrecy, it has recently come to the surface.
A 2009 book from a colonel in the CCP’s People’s Liberation Army (PLA), “The China Dream,” is one of many examples Pillsbury gives, noting the colonel “alludes to the importance of studying American weaknesses, and preparing to hit the Americans once the West becomes wise to China’s true game plan.”
Pillsbury also notes a 2005 Chinese piece that calls for a new world under the CCP’s rule that “values order over freedom, ethics over law, and elite governance over democracy and human rights.”
Mosher has come to similar conclusions about the CCP’s ultimate goal, and was among the first scholars to warn about it with his 2000 book, “Hegemon: China’s Plan to Dominate Asia and the World.”
All the things we’ve built over the centuries, the CCP would roll back.”— Steven Mosher

He said that in 1958, Mao Zedong said that as soon as the CCP becomes strong enough, it would “establish an earth control committee.”
“What does that mean? That’s means what it says,” Mosher said. ” China, when it becomes politically and militarily powerful enough, Mao wanted to reach out beyond China and control the rest of the world.”
The South China Sea is one key piece in this push. Many defense experts have warned that China is trying to establish an “anti-access, area denial strategy” that would allow it to form a defensive ring around China, and keep other nations—particularly the United States—at a safe distance militarily.
The CCP is already well on its way into this strategy, and Chinese military hawks are speaking about it openly.
South China Morning Post reported on Feb. 28 that “China’s military is prepared ‘to defend sovereignty’ in the South China Sea.”
Chinese Maj. Gen. Qiao Liang, a professor at the PLA National Defense University made this even more clear in a recent op-ed published in China Military Online, the official mouthpiece of the PLA.
“To effectively contain the United States, other countries shall think more about how to cut off the capital flow to the United States while formulating their strategies,” Liang wrote, noting the strategic importance

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When Victoria Beckham announced on social media that she was opening a store in Hong Kong, she unwittingly walked into a hornet’s nest.
“So excited to be coming to Hong Kong! My new store opens March 18th,” wrote Ms. Beckham the former Spice Girl on her Instagram and Facebook accounts in both English and Chinese. However, it was not her words that angered many Internet users; it was her usage of the simplified Chinese script.
Beckham had just intruded on a fierce cultural and ideological battle between native Hongkongers and the Chinese regime.
Hong Kong Facebook user “Marcus Lui” wrote “Please respect our language, do not use simplified Chinese, use traditional Chinese.” Another user, “Clare Sin,” reminded Ms. Beckham: “Hong Kong is using Traditional Chinese~unless your target customers are not Hongkongerssss.”
Two days later, Ms. Beckham modified her post with an additional line in the traditional Chinese script, a move Hongkongers appreciated. “Thanks for taking advice for using traditional Chinese,” wrote Facebook user “Peg Tong.”
The outburst by Hongkongers over Victoria Beckham’s choice of Chinese script are not petty complaints of a few fastidious linguists. In recent years, Hongkongers have become increasingly concerned over what they perceive to be the Chinese regime’s attempts to erode local culture and replace it with communist ideals and mainland customs.
Mainland media saw the dispute and also decided to weigh in. In a Feb. 23 editorial, Party mouthpiece People’s Daily slammed Hongkongers and Taiwanese (Taiwan also uses the traditional Chinese script) for their “ignorance.” “Ancient calligraphers all used simplified characters. It’s not an invention of modern people,” the paper said.
But it was actually the Communist Party under Chairman Mao Zedong that simplified Chinese characters in the 1950s after a plan to get rid of Chinese characters entirely was aborted. Many Chinese intellectuals at the time were against the simplification, arguing that it cheapened the written language by creating meaningless characters. The protest turned tragic for some—Chen Mengjia, a famous archaeologist, was labelled a “Rightist,” severely persecuted, and was eventually driven to suicide during the Cultural Revolution.
Perhaps emboldened by online anonymity, several Chinese Internet users decided to speak up for the use of the traditional Chinese script.
On the website of The Paper, a semi-official online media outlet based in Shanghai, one netizen wrote in the comments section of an article on the Victoria Beckham Chinese script debate: “I agree with what the Hong Kong and Taiwan people say. Simplified Chinese characters do debase Chinese culture.”
“It took thousands of years for traditional Chinese characters to take shape, while simplified Chinese characters was a few months work for a handful of Communist Party experts. It is easy to tell which script is better and which is worse,” wrote another netizen from Shaanxi Province.

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“I came here to do more than eat and …!” yelled Chairman Mao Zedong in a Russian country house on December 1949, the final word being the kind of expletive Mao was known for. Having just seized China, the Great Helmsman expected to be feted in the Soviet Union, and secure much-needed economic aid and technical expertise from his communist counterpart Josef Stalin.
But having Mao do nothing but feast and pass excrement was Stalin’s plan all along.
While studying the Russian intelligence archives, former Soviet agent Igor Atamanenko discovered that Soviet spies had collected and studied Mao’s stool samples for 10 days when he was in Moscow, according to BBC. Intelligence officers had reportedly collected Mao’s poop via secret boxes that were connected to toilets set up specially for the Chinese Communist Party chief.
The malodorous espionage was part of a 1940s top secret project by the Soviet secret police to piece together a psychological profile of foreign leaders. Lavrenti Beria, the notorious Soviet security and secret police chief, headed the classified project, according to Atamanenko.
If the Soviet’s pseudo-scatologists found “high levels of amino acid” in the fecal matter, for example, “they concluded that person was calm and approachable,” Atamanenko told BBC. Absence of potassium meant the person had a “nervous disposition” and suffered from insomnia.
MORE:Why Did China Tear Down the Giant Gold Statue of Mao?
Stalin was supposedly less than impressed with Mao after the results of the feces analysis came through, and refused to do a deal with the Chairman.
Mao eventually summoned the wily Zhou Enlai, the Chinese premier, to negotiate with the Soviets. The best Zhou could come up with after weeks of negotiations was the Treaty of Friendship, Alliance, and Mutual Assistance.
This agreement hugely favored the Soviets: for $300 million in military aid payed out over five years, China had to give up sizable territory to the Soviets; pay exorbitant salaries to Soviet advisers attached to China; and exempt Russians from Chinese law, a measure reminiscent of the humiliating extraterritorial demands of Western powers.
MORE:How the Grandsons of Chiang Kai-Shek and Mao Zedong Found Themselves in an Online Beauty Contest
The secretive excrement project was later ditched by Nikita Khrushchev, Stalin’s successor, according to Russian newspaper Komsomolskaya Pravda.
It is unclear if Mao Zedong was aware of this change. When visiting the Soviet Union in 1957, he eschewed the flush toilets installed at the former residence of a Russian empress, where he lodged, and insisted on using his own chamber pot.

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  • Author: <a href="http://www.theepochtimes.com/n3/author/larry-ong/" rel="author">Larry Ong</a>, <a href="http://www.theepochtimes.com/" title="Epoch Times" rel="publisher">Epoch Times</a>
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An almost finished, 120-foot-tall golden statue of Mao Zedong could once be seen sitting, hands on lap, atop a wire frame in front of a barren field in central China. Giant Mao would only survive two days more after its existence was reported in Western media and widely mocked on the Chinese Internet.
Demolition teams started tearing down the statue in Tongxu County, Henan Province on the morning of Jan. 7, according to The New York Times. By Friday, the 3 million yuan ($465,000) statue of the former Chinese regime leader and dictator, which was financed and constructed under the auspices of a local businessman and prominent county Party cadre, was demolished.
The Chinese Communist Party (CCP) has always struggled to commemorate Mao Zedong, its most prominent but problematic leader. While Mao’s image is kitsch—his face adorns tourist memorabilia in marketplaces—the erecting and swift tearing down of the golden Mao in Henan is loaded with symbolic meaning, according to experts.
Perhaps the demolishing of such a large Mao statue marks a turning point in the Chinese authorities’ stance on criticizing Mao.— Chen Kuide, ‘China in Perspective’ chief editor

According to state mouthpiece People’s Daily, local authorities said that the statue was demolished because its construction “wasn’t registered or reviewed.” But “the phrase is merely a language-game device used to put a ‘legal’ face on what somebody with CCP power wants,” wrote Perry Link, Professor Emeritus of East Asian Studies at Princeton University and longtime China watcher, to Epoch Times in an email.
Link added: “In general, the Communist Party’s dilemma about how to handle Mao’s legacy is this: if you give him up, you undermine a foundation of CCP power; if you make too much of him, you invite genuine re-examination of what he did, which includes some really ugly things.”
On the one hand, the Party credits Mao for overthrowing the Chinese Nationalist Party and ousting Western interests from the country. 
The Party, however, can’t adequately defend the impact of Mao’s disastrous campaigns: Henan Province, where the golden Mao statue stood, was one of the areas worst-hit by famine in China during the Great Leap Forward from 1959 to 1962; later, the decade-long Cultural Revolution destroyed traditional Chinese culture and caused the deaths of tens of millions of Chinese.
Despite the Party’s attempt at a more moderate appraisal of Mao—subsequent Party leader Deng Xiaoping famously called his predecessor “seven parts good, three parts bad” in 1982—a Mao cult emerged from the late 1980s to early 1990s when the Party promoted past revolutionaries to strengthen its legitimacy, which had suffered while reforms were made to open up China. A second “Mao craze” arose in recent years as rising income inequality led some people to worship Mao’s socialist ideals.
Still, the building and swift destruction of the golden Mao statue would have been impossible following the death of the former dictator up to the 1990s because the Party was still sensitive to monumental tributes, according to Chen Kuide, the chief editor of the online Chinese magazine China in Perspective.
Then, “even if someone did find a way to erect a statue, it would be secretly taken down and not announced,” Chen said in a telephone interview.
“Perhaps the demolishing of such a large Mao statue marks a turning point in the Chinese authorities’ stance on criticizing Mao,” he added.

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  • Author: <a href="http://www.theepochtimes.com/n3/author/larry-ong/" rel="author">Larry Ong</a>, <a href="http://www.theepochtimes.com/" title="Epoch Times" rel="publisher">Epoch Times</a>
  • Category: General