Contractors working on the bridge project connecting Hong Kong to Zhuhai and Macau have slapped the Hong Kong government with claims totalling …

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Friends and supporters of the late dissident Liu Xiaobo gathered worldwide on Wednesday to mark the traditional Chinese observance of the seventh …

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Hong Kong’s legislature on Wednesday finally approved extra spending of HK$3.6 billion on education, although tension remained between the …

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More than 5,000 cyclists from around the world are expected to test their mettle later this year at the city’s third annual Cyclothon, which will feature for …

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Hong Kong’s health minister has for the first time named St Teresa’s Hospital as one of the private institutions the government is in talks with under a …

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A Hong Kong committee looking at an application for an education funding boost of HK$3.6 billion was suspended twice on Wednesday morning, with …

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A Hongkonger returned to his Tsim Sha Tsui flat after an overnight mahjong session only to find his safe containing cash and three watches, worth a …

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What is the cost of crime in Hong Kong? A total of HK$380 billion over the five years from 2012 to 2016, according to estimates from the first study to …

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The Hong Kong Book Fair, one of the largest in the world, returned on Wednesday with a record number of exhibitors and loads of travel-related …

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Hong Kong’s legislature is scrutinising an application for a HK$3.6 billion boost in funding for education – an election pledge made earlier this year by …

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Two of Hong Kong’s recently disqualified pan-democratic lawmakers have been ranked among the city’s best performers in the Legislative Council, …

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Hundreds of early birds queued up at dawn in Wan Chai for the annual Hong Kong Book Fair, the largest in Asia. Hong Kong News. Get updates direct …

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The businessman who is buying the city’s top news magazine from pro-democracy publisher Next Digital says he has no plans for the time being to lay …

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An area in Hong Kong’s New Territories still faces the threat of flash floods as the city’s Drainage Services Department said that a nearby river did not …

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Amidst the Chinese regime’s ever-escalating crackdown on free speech and freedom of the internet, WhatsApp has become the latest victim, as users in China report that the private messaging app has been blocked by the Chinese regime.

Numerous reports from WhatsApp users inside China indicate that the app became partially blocked beginning the night of July 17, as videos or pictures sent by users were no longer reaching their intended recipients. At that time users reported that text messages still went through normally. However, recently some users have reported that even text messages have been blocked.

The regime has long blocked other popular Western social media platforms such as Twitter, Facebook, and YouTube through its “Great Firewall,” the unofficial name for the sophisticated internet censorship system used to control all aspects of online activity in China.

Users can still use a virtual private network (VPN) to send text and media content through WhatsApp, just as with other blocked Western websites and applications. The use of VPNs to circumvent censorship adds extra cost and inconvenience to the users, however, and Beijing has also started cracking down on VPN service providers as of late.

Many WhatsApp users in China reacted angrily to the latest ban on their use of the messaging tool. Some say the authorities are essentially cutting off China from the rest of the world’s internet, according to the Hong Kong-based Apple Daily.

Before the blocking on July 17, WhatsApp had been one of the few remaining messaging apps available for users in China that is not controlled by the Chinese regime. WeChat, the dominant messaging application in China with hundreds of millions of users, is owned by the Chinese company Tencent.

The dominance of WeChat has been widely attributed to the company’s close collaboration with the Chinese regime in implementing self-censorship and surveillance mechanisms in its application.

According to Citizen Lab, a Canadian research laboratory, WeChat performs censorship on the server-side, which means that when user sends a message it passes through a remote server that contains rules for implementing censorship.

A 2016 survey done by Amnesty International that ranks the world’s most popular messaging apps in terms of privacy protection for users gave WeChat a score of 0 out of 100, meaning that users of WeChat receive little or no encryption protection for their communications and the app is completely exposed to censorship and surveillance by the Chinese regime. WhatsApp, which is owned by Facebook, received a score of 73 out of 100.

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