BEIJINGChina’s government has highlighted big data, encryption technology and “core technologiessuch as semiconductors as the key elements of its push to grow into a tech powerhouse, according to a new five-year plan released Saturday that envisages the Internet as a major source of growth as well as a potential risk.
Even as it highlighted the need to improve Internet infrastructure to rural areas and unlock the digital economy’s potential, Chinese economic planners called for a more secure and better managed Web, with enhanced Internet control systems, Internet security laws and real-name registration policies.
Chinese officials including Internet czar Lu Wei have played down concerns over what critics have described as China’s expanding Web censorship, saying that it is the Chinese government’s sovereign prerogative and a necessary measure to maintain domestic order.
China’s development plan calls for a better cybersecurity approval system and more “preciseWeb management to “clean up illegal and bad information.
The plan also calls for a multilateral, democratic, transparent and international governance system and active participation in international Internet governance efforts.
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Premier Li Keqiang highlighted the promise of the Internet, saying Saturday that various traditional sectors, ranging from manufacturing to government to health care, need to connect to the Web and raise their efficiency as part of an overarching national strategy called “Internet Plus.He vowed to raise research and technology spending to account for 2.5 percent of gross domestic product (GDP) in the five years through 2020, which he said would mark a “remarkable achievement.
The five-year plan calls for all families in large cities to have access to 100 megabyte-per-second Internet service and broadband coverage reaching 98 percent of the population in incorporated villages.
Ao mesmo tempo, Chinese leaders, wary of over-relying on foreign technology, will seek to boost China’s homegrown industry and cut down on importsa strategy that has drawn complaints from trade partners like the United States.
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Similar to previous years, when Chinese leaders highlighted industries such as e-commerce as a growth focus, the new draft of China’s development plan specifically elevated big data and cloud computing, relatively new and promising fields that Chinese industry experts view as not yet cornered by U.S. companies that dominate other parts of the technology market.
The plan also calls for China to catch up on “coretechnologies such as semiconductors and basic computer parts and software, as well as encryption technology.
China’s campaign to beef up its chip technology has encountered political resistance from the United States. China’s national chip champion, Tsinghua Unigroup, said last month that it would abandon its attempt to acquire a stake in California data storage firm Western Digital, the second deal it has scrapped because of opposition from U.S. regulators who do not want sensitive technology to fall into Chinese hands.
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Internet censorship in China is ubiquitous and well known, and for years the Chinese regime has provided different explanations for its bevy of restrictions. Traditionally, these have included the dangers of pornography, the threat of Western influences, the risks to social harmony.
But now the propaganda authorities have come out with a new one: Chinese Internet users just aren’t smart enough.
On Jan. 28, the Cyberspace Administration of China (CAC), the Party agency in charge of Internet control, ran a story saying that Chinese Internet users had a major problem in exercising their judgement. The article was titled: “Ability to Critically Comprehend is InsufficientNetizens Fail to Make the Grade.The story was based on surveys from 35,880 Internet users conducted by the by KdNet Data Research Center, an institute run by the state-run newspaper Southern Metropolis Daily.
The survey examined the abilities of Internet users in three categories: “critical comprehension,” “using new media,” and “communicating using new media.
Respondents were scored from to 5. According to the results, average scores fell in the 3s, though the outcome for “critical comprehensionwas the lowest, with an average score of 3.42.
But the definition of “critical comprehensionis not the one you might expect. The term appears to refer to the ability to critically evaluate and judge information, evidence, and argumentsbut in an explanation of what it meant, the official website explained that critical comprehension referred to “an understanding of the content of online media, and the operating regulations and rules of the overall online media industry.
He Lingnan, one of the researchers involved in the survey and a lecturer at Sun Yat-Sen University in southern China’s Guangdong Province, was quoted saying, in heavy bureaucratese: “The governmentshould pay more attention to the increasingly prominent issue of online behavior,” and that there should be “policy and institutional support, and specialized education, to encourage the improvement of behavior online.
It is unclear if the Cyberspace Administration of China would be the one implementing the measures to better “educateusers in their online behavior and understanding of the law, though if this were to take place, it would likely result in more censorship.
Writing on news portal Sina, which originally published the results of the survey, an Internet user in Beijing commented: “According to the standard of the Chinese government, the more the Internet users praise the government, the better the quality they are considered to be.
An example of supposed bad behaviorperhaps by someone whose critical comprehension of online behavior was insufficienttook place in September 2013, when a 20-year-old woman, surnamed Zhao, was arrested by police after she posted “I heard a murder was committed in Zhouzhuang. Does anyone know what actually happened?”
Though Zhao’s intent was only to get verification of the story, the police said she had caused a social disturbance, and that is why she was arrested.
Comprehend that.

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Análise Notícias
At the time of this writing, the fate of Hong Kong’s controversial Copyright (Amendment) Bill 2014, also dubbed “Internet Article 23,has yet to be decided.
The bill is for protecting copyrights on the internet and would have been tabled at the Legislative Council on Wednesday, dezembro. 9, for its Second Reading, Committee Stage, and Third Reading.
The introduction of this bill has raised grave concerns in the local community. Internet users, civic groups, and people involved in creative works fear that the passing of the bill will impose great restrictions on their right to freedom of expression. Sobre 230,000 people have signed a petition to oppose the bill.
Admittedly, compared with the shelved 2011 Copyright (Amendment) Bill, the latest bill has already expanded the scope of copyright exception by exempting criminal and civil liabilities in circumstances involving parody, satire, caricature, pastiche, commenting on current events, and quotations. But it is not enough to allay public concerns.
Many groups have put forward proposals to the government. The Copyrights & Derivative Works Alliance and the Keyboard Frontline have requested that the exemption should be expanded to cover all user-generated content as in the case of Canada. Em outras palavras, publication of non-profit-making creations for personal use will be exempted.
Other requests include clearly stating that the crime related to the dishonest usage of computers is excluded in the copyright law, and explicitly excluding the possibility that the copyright law can be overridden by a contract or other legally effective agreement.
The adoption of the fair use principle, widely used in many countries, has also been advocated. It permits limited use of copyrighted material without acquiring permission from the rights holders. Examples of fair use in U.S. copyright law include commentary, search engines, criticism, parody, news reporting, research, teaching, and so on.
As an international city, Hong Kong must catch up with developments in other countries in the protection of intellectual property rights. portanto, the enactment of such legislation is inevitable.
Contudo, given that Hong Kong’s freedoms have suffered serious erosion in recent years, it is understandable that Hong Kong people have become highly sensitive to any moves by the government that might further aggravate the situation.
Irrespective of whether the bill would have been passed on Wednesday or not, the only option available to the Hong Kong people is to hold on to their struggle for true democracy. Will they prevail?

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Beijing and Shanghai may lie almost 1,000 miles apart, but their metro riders share one thing in common. Each morning, commuters hunch over smartphones or tablets to watch the latest Chinese or Korean TV drama or Hollywood movies downloaded from the internet.
Chances are, those videos are downloaded or streamed for freevia legal means or pirated.
But that may be set to change. Internet and media giants are making massive bets in content and technologies, aiming to disrupt China’s longstanding culture of free web entertainment.
Their goal: encourage people to pay for content.
Appetite for Videos
China’s online video market is expected to reach RMB 36.8 bilhão (US$5.8 billion) dentro 2015, uma 50 percent increase from 2014, according to iResearch, a Chinese internet consultancy. Around RMB 15.2 billion of that figure comes from online video advertising, with the remainder consisting of subscriptions and purchases.
While that’s seems high, online video is still a small portion of the RMB 209 bilhão (US$32.9 billion) Chinese internet users expect to spend in overall online entertainment, which includes music and games.
This fragmented environment cemented China’s reputation as a market where copyrights go to die.

The gap is apparent when taken into context with how users spend their time online. As of June 2015, Chinese Internet users spent 33 percent of their time on the web on online videos. That’s by far the biggest chunk of time spent on online entertainment activitiessocial networking was 10.6 por cento, and online gaming was only 5.9 por cento. The remainder was spent on non-entertainment online activities.
Em outras palavras, revenues from online videos aren’t commensurate with usage demand. China has more than 650 million internet users, and monetizing the online video market has become an arms race between domestic internet giants.
Wild Wild West
The question is, how to convince millions of Chinese web users to pay for content?
In the United States, Hollywood movies generally follow the same distribution model. Films are shown in cinemas first, followed by DVD, Blu-ray, and streaming/on-demand platforms. Netflix, Amazon.com, and Hulu are the major players in online paid streaming video.
Media and entertainment giants view China as the new frontier. And in many ways, it’s still akin to the “Wild Wild West.
No specific distribution channel is customary for domestic Chinese movie releases. Studios may choose to debut films and TV shows on any number of distribution channels including online and mobile. Legal streaming services are numerous and fragmented, coexisting with a number of sites streaming low-quality pirated content.
This fragmented, free-for-all environment encouraged the rampant piracy that has plagued Chinese entertainment industry in recent decades, and cemented China’s reputation as a market where copyrights go to die.
Arms Race
There are new sheriffs in town. The impending culture shift is led by the “BAT,” China’s big three internet giants of Baidu, Alibaba, and Tencent.
Their strategy is to create online platforms with libraries of high-quality and desirable content in high definition, able to be streamed or downloaded on-the-go. With a compelling product, theyand Hollywood studioshope some users would move from illegal sites to these paid platforms. The services will be promoted alongside the internet giantsexisting productsthink Taobao, WeChat, and QQwhich already dominate the social lives of Chinese internet users.
“The generation of users born post 1990 understands the value of content. They are cash-rich, but time-poor. They are willing to pay for the convenience of accessing quality without having to go through the complications of finding illegal content,” Yang Xianghua, senior VP of iQIYI, said in an interview with Variety magazine.
Alibaba, which runs e-retailer Taobao and its namesake internet wholesaler website, is spending billions in this effort. em novembro. 6, Alibaba agreed to pay around US$4.4 billion to purchase the remaining stake of Youku Tudou it doesn’t already own. Youkua Chinese cross between YouTube and Huluhosts a number of well-known video bloggers, has a huge user base, and can drive traffic to Alibaba’s more lucrative online video ventures.
One service standing to benefit is Tmall Box Office, a streaming service launched by Alibaba earlier this year. Similar to Netflix, it requires monthly or annual subscriptions and offers a mix of Chinese and foreign movies and TV shows. Payments (around US$6 for the monthly plan) can be conveniently made viayou guessed itAlipay, the company’s online payment service.
Taking a page out of Netflix’s playbook, Alibaba is also turning itself into a movie studio. Hong Kong-based Alibaba Pictures was launched in March 2015 to produce Chinese-language TV shows and movies. It also invests in large-scale Hollywood productionsin June Alibaba signed a deal to invest an undisclosed amount in the next “Mission: Impossiblefilm. Last year the company obtained rights from Lionsgate to broadcast and stream movies such as “The Twilight Sagaand TV shows such as “Mad Menand “Weeds” na China.
Baidu, China’s No. 1 motor de pesquisa, also built its online video platform iQIYI into a major player in content streaming. Last month, iQIYI signed an agreement with Comcast Corp. to become the exclusive online distributor of Universal Studiosnew and existing films in China.
comc, which owns China’s biggest social media platforms QQ and WeChat, reached an agreement last week to become the exclusive online distributor of Paramount Picturesfuture releases including “Star Trek Beyond,” set to debut in 2016. The company also acquired online distribution rights to Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer’s James Bond franchise, including the newly released “Spectre.
It already has a war chest of popular western films. Tencent owns online distribution rights to Walt Disney’s “Star Warsfranchise, Time Warner’s HBO properties, and recently acquired an equity stake in the upcoming movie adaptation of video game “Warcraft.
For Hollywood studios, China has long been a flawed market. Studios frequently face off against Beijing’s censorship police, which demands content alterations before release. Even after films are approved, box-office receipts are the only material form of revenues for studios. DVD and Blu-ray sales are virtually nonexistent due to rampant piracy.
To make up for this gap, NOS. studios see digital distribution as a potential new revenue stream in China. Timing will largely follow the U.S. distribution model. Por exemplo, MGM’s latest Bond film “Spectrewill be

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