Image depicting the current-day Chinese saying which describes a united young couple who live happily even in poverty with the term “riding together in a carriage driven by deer”. (Internet photo)Image depicting the current-day Chinese saying which describes a united young couple who live happily even in poverty with the term “riding together in a carriage driven by deer”. (Internet photo)

Bao Xuan came from an impoverished family during the Western Han Dynasty, 2000 År siden. His mentor appreciated his high morals and let his daughter Shaojun marry Bao, endowing them with a gorgeous dowry.

An Excellent Wife

Bao said to his bride: “You were born into a wealthy family and are used to luxurious ornaments. But I am poor, I could not accept such rich gifts.”

His bride answered: “My father saw that you paid attention to cultivating good conduct and virtue, leading a simple, thrifty life, thus he let me marry you so that I could serve you. As I’m your wife now, I will obey you.”

Bao Xuan laughed happily: “If you could think this way that is my wish.”

Shaojun put away all her luxurious dresses and ornaments and switched to simple attire, riding back to the village with Bao in a carriage drawn by deer.

After greeting her mother-in-law, Shaojun immediately started household chores, carrying out the duty of a daughter-in-law. As an excellent wife, together with her husband, Shaojun’s name was also recorded in the history book of the Han Dynasty.

People nowadays in China describe a united young couple who live happily even in poverty with the term “riding together in a carriage driven by deer”.

A Magical Encounter

Bao Xuan was later recommended to become a government officer.

Once on his way to the capital, Bao met a scholar who was hurrying alone on the road. The scholar suddenly had a heart attack. Bao tried to help him but could not save the man who died quickly.

Bao did not know the name of the scholar but saw that he carried a book of scrolls made of white silk together with ten pieces of silver. Bao used one piece of silver to arrange the burial of the scholar, placed the rest of the silver underneath his head, and the book of silk scrolls on his belly.

After saying prayers, Bao Xuan spoke into the scholar’s tomb: “If your soul can still work, you should let your family know that you are buried here. I now have other duties to attend to, I cannot stay here longer.” He bade farewell and carried on with his journey.

Upon arriving at the capital, Bao Xuan noticed a white horse following him. The horse would not allow anybody but Bao get close to it. It would not let anyone else feed it. So Bao adopted the horse.

After Bao completed his mission in the capital, he rode this white horse home but got lost on the way. He saw the residence of a marquis. As it was getting dark, he went forward to ask for lodging. He presented his name card to the master of the family.

The servant who saw the horse with Bao at the door reported to the Marquis: “This guest stole our horse”.

The Marquis said: “Bao Xuan is a man of good reputation. There must be reason for this. Do not say unfounded things.”

The Marquis asked Bao: “How did you get this horse? He used to be ours and we do not know why he disappeared.”

Bao told in detail his experience with the scholar and his heart attack. The Marquis was shocked: “That scholar, it was my son!"

The Marquis retrieved the coffin of his son. When he opened it, he saw the silver and the white silk scroll, all laying there as Bao described.

Kilde: “Biographies of Exemplary Women” in “Book of the Later Han” or “History of the Later Han” a Chinese court document covering the years from 6 til 189 A.D..

“Lie Yi Zhuan”, a novel written by Cao Pi, the Emperor of Cao Wei.

Edited by Damian Robin.

Les mer

Les hele artikkelen her

Cangjie was sent down to China from the heavens to create Chinese writing, he was born with four eyes. This portrait of Cangjie is an 18th century painting held in the National Library of France. (Public domain, combination image compiled by Epoch Times)Cangjie was sent down to China from the heavens to create Chinese writing, he was born with four eyes. This portrait of Cangjie is an 18th century painting held in the National Library of France. (Public domain, combination image compiled by Epoch Times)

The Chinese character 滅 (mie) means eliminate, extinguish, or destroy. Within this character, the ancient Chinese philosophy of the elements of the universe are at play.

The character 滅 is formed with three parts: 火 fire, 戌 a weapon, and the radical on the left-hand side 氵 that represents water.

(xu) is a full character by itself, meaning a kind of long handle weapon, but it is also used in the traditional Chinese calendar, representing the eleventh of the twelve Earthly Branches, corresponding to the element earth.

In “Shuowen Jiezi”, the early 2nd-century Chinese dictionary from the Han Dynasty, fire is described as the strongest Yang Qi (in Chinese culture it is believed that Qi is a form of energy), yet it can be engulfed by 戌 – earth.

In the interaction between the radical 氵 and the characters 火 and 戌, water extinguishes fire, fire gives (re-)birth to earth, while earth can engulf fire.

In Bone Oracle Script, the earliest ancient Chinese writing, 戌 was written as shown below:

axe

Doesn’t it look like a fire axe used by fire fighters today? So the whole character 滅 is like a well-equipped fire engine.

In the simplified character “灭” used in Mainland China, the water and the fire axe have gone, there is only a horizontal stroke on the top of fire. Let’s hope that the fire-fighting facilities at fire stations on the Mainland have not also been simplified!

As one of the five elements, the radical氵, with three drops of water, is in common usage. When you see it as part of a character, you can guess that it is related to water-like or flowing concepts such as: 洪流 torrent, 溶 to melt, 活 alive, 海洋 ocean, 沙灘 beach, 游泳 swimming, 洗澡 bathing, 污染 pollution, 清潔 cleaning, 河 river, 湖 lake, 淚 tears, 汗 sweat, 深 deep, 淺 shallow, 油 oil …

derimot, when water becomes ice, , instead of three drops, , the left-hand side radical has been reduced to two drops, , as water is less able to flow.

Other characters with two drops of water include: 冬 winter, 寒冷 cold, 凍 frozen, 凋 withered, 凄 a desolate chilling feeling …

It is said that Cangjie, the person who created Chinese writing 5,000 År siden, was born with four eyes. This led to his deeper observation of the natural world, its creatures, and processes, and to his discerning the truth by piercing through to the depths of even the greatest mysteries.

Edited by Damian Robin.

Les mer

Les hele artikkelen her
  • Merker:, ,
  • Forfatter: <a href="http://www.theepochtimes.com/n3/author/joyce-lo/" rel="author">Joyce Lo</en>, <a href="http://www.theepochtimes.com/" title="Epoch Times" rel="publisher">Epoch Times</en> og <a href="http://www.theepochtimes.com/n3/author/zhu-li/" rel="author">Zhu Li</en>, <a href="http://www.theepochtimes.com/" title="Epoch Times" rel="publisher">Epoch Times</en>
  • Kategori: Generell

Cangjie was sent down to China from the heavens to create Chinese writing, he was born with four eyes. This portrait of Cangjie is an 18th century painting held in the National Library of France. (Public domain, combination image compiled by Epoch Times)Cangjie was sent down to China from the heavens to create Chinese writing, he was born with four eyes. This portrait of Cangjie is an 18th century painting held in the National Library of France. (Public domain, combination image compiled by Epoch Times)

A 38-year-old Chinese from Chong Qing city met Cangjie in his dream. Cangjie taught him the art of literomancy, or deciphering Chinese characters. Literomancy, a form of fortune-telling, has been used for clairvoyance since ancient times.

According to Sound of Hope Broadcasting, the Chinese man, called San Mu, said that he dreamt of a huge elderly figure with white hair and a long beard.

The elderly person held San in the palm of his hand and asked: “Do you know me?” San shook his head: “No”. The elderly person said: “I am Cangjie who created the characters. Let me teach you how to decipher one”.

The character Cangjie taught San was 爆 (bao), meaning explode.

Both the left and right sides of 爆 are full characters. On the left is 火, meaning fire, and on the right is 暴 that carries the pronunciation of bao and means violent or brutal.

The main part of the character is on the right, , and itself contains three full characters in the upper, middle, and lower parts. They are: , which refers to the sun, , means common, and 水, water.

The one in the middle, , is an abbreviation of 中共 that refers to the Chinese Communist Party (CCP).

San recalls how Cangjie explained the full character of 爆:

Cangjie drew the character in the air first and then said: “People must not be associated with the CCP. You walk forward with it, you will get burnt by fire; you go upward with it, you will be burnt to death by the sun; you jump downward with it, you will be drowned.”

He continued: “Only when you disassociate yourself from it will you have a chance of survival, understand?” Afterwards Cangjie disappeared.

I Kina, most people have to join the CCP, either as Young Pioneers as soon as they reach school age—children are requested to wear a red scarf and routinely pledge their loyalty to the Party under the red flag each day—and/or in the Communist Youth League when they reach their teens.

Universities are active grounds for recruiting CCP Members, often under the camouflage of receiving an honor. Being a Party member is the only channel for gaining government posts.

What is strange is that though communists are atheists, everybody who joins CCP organizations must declare an oath of faith, devoting his life to the Party.

This literomancy reading of 爆 matches the interpretation of the Tuidang movement in China.

Tuidang literally means retreating from the Party. Through formally renouncing their association with CCP organizations, people cancel their past pledges or their deals with the CCP (whether they made their pledges unwittingly or were seduced into them).

The number of Chinese people who have disassociated from the Party is immense.

As one of the five elements, , the character for fire, is also a commonly used radical. When you see it, you would guess that the word is related to fire. Such as 煉 refine, 爐 furnace, 燈 light, 炒 fry, 煤 coal, 灰 ash, 煙 smoke, 燃燒 burning, 燦爛 bright, 火災 fire disaster, and 滅 eliminate …

Can you find where the fire is in the last character, ? This is also an interesting character. We shall write about it next time.

Edited by Damian Robin

Les mer

Les hele artikkelen her
  • Merker:, ,
  • Forfatter: <a href="http://www.theepochtimes.com/n3/author/joyce-lo/" rel="author">Joyce Lo</en>, <a href="http://www.theepochtimes.com/" title="Epoch Times" rel="publisher">Epoch Times</en> og <a href="http://www.theepochtimes.com/n3/author/zhu-li/" rel="author">Zhu Li</en>, <a href="http://www.theepochtimes.com/" title="Epoch Times" rel="publisher">Epoch Times</en>
  • Kategori: Generell

Cangjie was sent down to China from the heavens to create Chinese writing, he was born with four eyes. This portrait of Cangjie is an 18th century painting held in the National Library of France. (Public domain, combination image compiled by Epoch Times)Cangjie was sent down to China from the heavens to create Chinese writing, he was born with four eyes. This portrait of Cangjie is an 18th century painting held in the National Library of France. (Public domain, combination image compiled by Epoch Times)

The Chinese character 塵 (chen) refers to dust. It is formed of two parts, each a full character. The upper one is 鹿, a deer. In Bone Oracle Script it was practically a full drawing of a deer, as below:

lu

The lower part of the character 塵 is 土, meaning earth or soil.

塵 is called an associative compound character as it combines two already existing characters, deer and earth to show its meaning. It conjures up a mental picture of a group of deer running, causing dust to rise.

Chinese painting of a group of Deer. (Courtesy of Qiu Yan)

Chinese painting of a group of Deer. (Courtesy of Qiu Yan)

The character 土, for earth, is a pictogram. It has two horizontal strokes indicating the fertile topsoil going down to the subsoil with a vertical stroke symbolizing things growing from the earth.

Chinese legend tells us that the earth is not only the source of plants and food. It tells us that the goddess Nü Wa crafted humans from yellow earth using her own figure as a model. The Bible also tells of Man’s creation by God using clay.

I fortiden, I could not understand the literal truth of this. If my body was made of the earth or clay, how could I swim without dissolving in water?

Then I came across the writings of Mr Li Hongzhi, in “Zhuan Falun (Volume II)” that gave me an answer to this query.

From this text I understood that the earth referred to in Man’s creation is not the same as what we see with our human eyes. From their higher levels, celestial beings see the molecules of earth in the same way that we see dust or earth. Does it make sense to you?

The simplified character for dust, , is formed with the character 小, meaning little, on top of 土 , earth. It is logical, but the poetic, vivid image from the original version of “dust” is lost.

As one of the five elements, , the character for earth, is also a useful radical. When you see it as part of a character, you can guess that character is related to earth. Here are some examples: 土地 land, 地址 address, 城 city, 堡 castle, 墻壁 wall, 壁壘 barrier, 坎坷 bumpy, 堵塞 blocked, 埋 burial, 堅 solid, 境 border, 坐 sitting, 場 field, and 基 base.

Edited by Damian Robin.

Les mer

The Secret Within the Chinese Character for Enemy

Les hele artikkelen her

Cangjie was sent down to China from the heavens to create Chinese writing, he was born with four eyes. This portrait of Cangjie is an 18th century painting held in the National Library of France. (Public domain, combination image compiled by Epoch Times)Cangjie was sent down to China from the heavens to create Chinese writing, he was born with four eyes. This portrait of Cangjie is an 18th century painting held in the National Library of France. (Public domain, combination image compiled by Epoch Times)

When used as a noun, (xin) refers to a written communication, letter, message or information. When used as a verb, it means to trust, believe, have faith or confidence in a person, idea or thing.

The component on the left side of 信 is the radical亻, a compressed form of the character 人 (ren), man. On the right side is 言 (yan), referring to a word or language.

Dermed, a man plus a word represents trust and belief. Does this logic seem naïve to people of this modern age?

Actually, this is embodied in the English motto “A man’s word is his bond,” where ‘bond’ goes beyond the idea of a money agreement to mean duty, obligation, promise or contract.

Så, some time ago, in English as well as Chinese, what a man said was to be relied on, what have we been doing to make this concept and practice change? That is really something worth pondering on …

By itself 言 (yan), meaning language, is a full character.

If you were asked to design an image to represent language, how would you go about it? Let’s look at the Cangjie design in the ancient Chinese writing of Oracle Bone Script:

201603071623094

The Oracle Bone Script character for language is on the left and the modern day full Chinese character is on the right.

The lower part of 言 is the character 口 (kou), meaning mouth; above the mouth, is a leaf curled up as a whistle or flute. Hence language is the sound from the mouth of a man. What a romantic yet logically good design.

This 言 is widely used as a radical in many characters, such as 誠信 integrity, 許諾 promise, 誓言 pledge, 辯護 defend, 謝謝 thanks, 請 please, 讀 read, 談話 talk, 討論 discussion, 讚 praise, 說謊 lie, 詩詞 poetry… Thus, even at a glance, we know that the character relates to man’s words.

In the simplified version used in Mainland China, when used as a radical on left or middle of a compound character, , is reduced to 讠, just a meaningless sign!

Edited by Damian Robin.

Les mer

Les hele artikkelen her
  • Merker:, , ,
  • Forfatter: <a href="http://www.theepochtimes.com/n3/author/joyce-lo/" rel="author">Joyce Lo</en>, <a href="http://www.theepochtimes.com/" title="Epoch Times" rel="publisher">Epoch Times</en> og <a href="http://www.theepochtimes.com/n3/author/zhu-li/" rel="author">Zhu Li</en>, <a href="http://www.theepochtimes.com/" title="Epoch Times" rel="publisher">Epoch Times</en>
  • Kategori: Generell
april 30, 2017

Courtesy of Hong Kong Disneyland.Courtesy of Hong Kong Disneyland.

Recently I read an article in a local Hong Kong newspaper. The author, a Hong Kong lady, said that a while ago she and her Japanese husband took their children to visit Hong Kong Disneyland. When they returned home, her husband reprimanded her.

She said Disneyland was crowded and there were long queues everywhere. Some Mainland tourists pushed her from behind and she scolded them. She also stopped some Mainland tourists who tried to cut into the lines.

Mr Japan was unhappy that she spoke loudly to people the whole day. “If the others want to cut the line, just let them be” he said, and added “we should not be impolite.”

Mrs Hong Kong thought that she was correct to stand up for the rights of herself and her children and to teach a lesson to those who broke the rules.

At first I agreed with Mrs Hong Kong, derimot, soon afterwards I read a story of a happening in China 2,500 År siden.

Scholar Nan Xiazi once visited Prince Cheng. Prince Cheng treated him to roasted Chinese giant salamander.

Nan said: “I heard that a real gentleman does not eat salamander.” (Salamander, also called “baby fish”, makes a sound like a baby crying, so a gentleman does not feel at ease to eat it).

The Prince said, “That is the matter of gentlemen, how does this affect you?"

Nan replied: “I hear that, if a man aims high, then he will constantly improve; if he resorts to degrading things, then his behavior will drop gradually. I dare not say that I am a true gentleman, but I really wish to become a gentleman of honor.”

He then quoted a saying from the Analects of Confucius: “When we see men of worth, we should think of equaling them; when we see men of a contrary character, we should turn inwards and examine ourselves” (見賢思齊焉見不賢而内自省也).

Upon reading this, I only want to congratulate Mrs Hong Kong for having a gentleman husband.

Kilde: “Shuo Yuan,” or Garden of Talks: stories and tales from Confucian scholar Liu Xiang from the pre-Qin period to the Western Han Dynasty.

Edited by Damian Robin.

Les hele artikkelen her

Cangjie was sent down to China from the heavens to create Chinese writing, he was born with four eyes. This portrait of Cangjie is an 18th century painting held in the National Library of France. (Public domain, combination image compiled by Epoch Times)Cangjie was sent down to China from the heavens to create Chinese writing, he was born with four eyes. This portrait of Cangjie is an 18th century painting held in the National Library of France. (Public domain, combination image compiled by Epoch Times)

Not long after Donald Trump became president of the United States, he authorized a military strike on a Syrian regime airfield, which had been used to launch a chemical attack that killed many of its own people.

Trump’s younger son, Eric Trump, recently told The Daily Telegraph that his father is a big believer in Ronald Reagan’s philosophy of achieving peace through strength. That is exactly the meaning of the Chinese character 武 (wu), for military or martial.

“The Art of War,” an ancient Chinese military treatise from 2,500 År siden, mentions that breaking the enemy’s resistance without fighting is supreme excellence, and this military philosophy is well expressed in the character 武 that carries a history of 5,000 år.

Let’s look at the formation of 武. The radical on the right side resembles the character 戈 (ge), a weapon used in ancient times. The weapon is a horizontal knife made of bronze or iron with a long handle.

The lower part of the left side is the character 止 (zhi), meaning to stop. Thus a military force has the ability to stop the use of weapons. A country like the United States with superior military power has the ability and obligation to stop violence and uphold righteousness.

The character 止 in ancient Chinese also refers to the toes or feet. Derfor, the character 武 literally refers to soldiers marching with weapons.

The character 舞, for dance, and 武, for military or martial, are both pronounced ‘wu’ but are written differently.

According to the website of the classical Chinese dance company Shen Yun Performing Arts, classical Chinese dance and martial arts (kung fu or wushu in Chinese) share some similarities. These two art forms are rooted in the same ancient culture. The same techniques can be either martial arts when used for fighting, or dance when used civilly.

Shen Yun is based in New York and has performed in major concert venues around the world since 2006. Eric Trump appreciated the performance when he saw it at the David Koch Theater at the Lincoln Center in New York a few years ago with Lara Yunaska, then his girlfriend and now his wife.

Edited by Sally Appert.

Les mer

Les hele artikkelen her
  • Merker:, , ,
  • Forfatter: <a href="http://www.theepochtimes.com/n3/author/joyce-lo/" rel="author">Joyce Lo</en>, <a href="http://www.theepochtimes.com/" title="Epoch Times" rel="publisher">Epoch Times</en> og <a href="http://www.theepochtimes.com/n3/author/zhu-li/" rel="author">Zhu Li</en>, <a href="http://www.theepochtimes.com/" title="Epoch Times" rel="publisher">Epoch Times</en>
  • Kategori: Generell

Cangjie was sent down to China from the heavens to create Chinese writing, he was born with four eyes. This portrait of Cangjie is an 18th century painting held in the National Library of France. (Public domain, combination image compiled by Epoch Times)Cangjie was sent down to China from the heavens to create Chinese writing, he was born with four eyes. This portrait of Cangjie is an 18th century painting held in the National Library of France. (Public domain, combination image compiled by Epoch Times)

Perhaps you currently have someone who is in conflict with your own interests, and you refer to him or her as your enemy. You may be surprised to learn the hidden meaning in the Chinese character 仇 (chou), meaning hatred, enmity, or enemy.

On the left side is the radical 亻, which refers to man. When seeing this radical in a Chinese character, even illiterate people could guess that it relates to a human.

On the right side is 九. This radical doubles as a full character meaning the number nine, but sometimes it refers to a general term for plentiful or numerous.

chou-bone-script

In Oracle bone script, the earliest ancient Chinese writing, the character 九 represents a force pushing upwards:

Thus the meaning of the character 仇, enemy, is a person who helps uplift you to higher levels.

People around us all have different moral standards, and we recognize a person with a higher moral level as a good person. During a conflict with an enemy, if a person handles the situation well, he or she can become a better person in the process.

Both Eastern and Western cultures believe that if a good person keeps improving and uplifting himself, becoming a better and better person, he or she can go to heaven and become a heavenly being.

Legend has it that when Cangjie created Chinese writing 5,000 År siden, heavenly secrets were revealed. It was so moving that the deities and spirits cried, and their tears dropped like millet from the heavens.

After learning the secret in this Chinese character, we can also understand why Jesus, living in the Middle East 2,000 År siden, told his disciples to love their enemies, though he did not explain the reason.

Edited by Sally Appert.

Les hele artikkelen her

Great Wall of China at Sunrise. (Fotolia plus composition by Epoch Times)Great Wall of China at Sunrise. (Fotolia plus composition by Epoch Times)

Huang Ba (130–51 B.C.) lived during the Western Han Dynasty. He learned legalism (understanding and administration of the law) starting at a young age. When he faced death later in his life, the first thing that came to his mind was to learn more. He said he could die without regret once he had learned the Tao, or Way.

In the year 72 B.C., according to the “Book of Han,” Minister Xia Housheng was imprisoned because he offended Emperor Xuan. Huang, who was the chief officer to the prime minister, was also imprisoned because of his support for Xia. Both were sentenced to death.

While in prison, Huang asked Xia to teach him “Shangshu,” one of the Five Classics of ancient Chinese literature. Xia refused with the reason that they were awaiting the death penalty.

Huang quoted a saying from Analects of Confucius: “Having heard the Tao in the morning, one can die in the evening.”

Xia agreed with him and taught him Shangshu.

A year later, an earthquake shocked 49 counties in central China. There were over 6,000 casualties. Emperor Xuan took that as a warning from heaven, and he granted amnesty to all.

Both Xia and Huang were released and were reassigned by the court. Huang was appointed governor of Ying Chuan County. He was known to be compassionate and had clear insights in judgment.

A Good Judge

According to “Zheyu Guijian,” a compilation of litigations finished in the Song Dynasty, when Huang was the local governor of Ying Chuan County, there was a wealthy family with two brothers living in the same household. The wives of the two brothers were pregnant at the same time.

The elder brother’s wife’s child was stillborn, and she hid that fact and snatched the baby of her sister-in-law, saying that it was hers. The dispute carried on for three years with no solution.

Huang put the child in the court and asked the two women to snatch the child. The elder sister-in-law took him rudely by force; the younger one, in fear of hurting the child, just looked on sadly.

Seeing this, Huang scolded the elder sister-in-law: “In your greed for family fortune, you only want to snatch the child, with no consideration that you are hurting him. The matter is now clear. Return the child immediately to your sister-in-law.”

The elder sister-in-law then admitted her guilt.

Edited by Sally Appert.

Les hele artikkelen her

A dragon shaped jade tablet pendant from the Warring States period of China (475–221 B.C.). Courtesy of Guimet Museum,France)A dragon shaped jade tablet pendant from the Warring States period of China (475–221 B.C.). Courtesy of Guimet Museum,France)

A marquis named Jing Hou once paid a visit to the prince of Wei State during the Warring States period of Chinese history (475–221 B.C.).

Jing Hou specially dressed up for the occasion, holding a sword with precious stone inlays on the left and a precious jade tablet pendant on the right, both sparkling brightly. derimot, the prince did not even take a look or ask any questions.

Jing Hou tried to raise the topic by asking, “Do you have precious treasures in Wei State?"

“Yes, selvfølgelig!” the prince replied.

“What are they?” Jing Hou asked.

The prince said, “The king honors credibility, the officers pledge their loyalty, the state has the love of its people, and these are the treasures of Wei State.”

“No, I did not mean these,” Jing Hou said. “I was asking about real precious objects.”

“Real treasures? Ja, selvfølgelig!” the prince replied. “We have sage Tu Shizhao ruling the country, so there is no overstocking or uneven distribution to the markets, eliminating cunning merchants making unjust fortunes.

“We have sage Xi Xin administrating the cities, so nobody will misappropriate lost objects on the road. We also have Mang Mao as officer in the court, and all talented people with good reputations come to pay tribute. These three sages are our true treasures,” the prince said.

This time Jing Hou understood the message, and he felt ashamed. He stood up as if at a loss, mounted his carriage, and left quickly without taking the precious sword or the jade tablet pendant with him.

The prince sent his servant on a horse to return the sword and pendant to Jing Hou with a message: “I am not capable of holding these treasures for you. Besides, these objects cannot become clothes for warming, and neither can they become food during a famine. They only bring about theft. So they might as well be given back to you.”

Kilde: “Shuo Yuan,” or Garden of Talks: stories and tales from Confucian scholar Liu Xiang from the pre-Qin period to the Western Han Dynasty.

Edited by Sally Appert.

Les hele artikkelen her

Cangjie was sent down to China from the heavens to create Chinese writing, he was born with four eyes. This portrait of Cangjie is an 18th century painting held in the National Library of France. (Public domain, combination image compiled by Epoch Times)Cangjie was sent down to China from the heavens to create Chinese writing, he was born with four eyes. This portrait of Cangjie is an 18th century painting held in the National Library of France. (Public domain, combination image compiled by Epoch Times)

We recently chatted with a French gentleman who works in Hong Kong, and he talked about what he had discovered about the profundity of the traditional Chinese character for “listen”.

This French friend had just attended an internal company training course. The trainer started with an elaborate explanation of the meaning of the Chinese character “聽”, or listen.

On the left side is an ear, and on the right side there are four characters: “十 目 一 心” Put together from top to bottom, they have the following meaning: “十” ten, “目” eye, “一” one, and “心” heart.

In listening, one does not only have to use the ears; one also has to use the eyes to make eye contact and use the heart to fully understand the subject. One listens with a full concentration of the mind.

In explaining the beauty of the traditional Chinese character, the trainer wisely instilled this understanding in the students attending his training course.

Upon closer observation, you can see that the right part of the character “聽” is identical to the right part of the character “德” (de), meaning virtue.

Listening quietly to others, without interrupting them impatiently, is a type of virtue.

In ancient times, Chinese people called their land “Shen Zhou,” the land of the divine. Chinese traditional culture is a divinely-inspired culture, and legend has it that scholar Cangjie was sent down to China by the heavens.

Cangjie was born with four eyes, enabling him to see through all creations on earth. He is the person who created Chinese writing.

The simplified character for “listen” used in mainland China today, “听” has only a mouth, “口” on the left, while on the right side is “斤” a derivative of the character for “hammer,” “斧” from ancient oracles.

How could one listen with a mouth and a hammer? Dermed, next time you see mainland Chinese visitors speaking loudly in public, won’t you feel sympathy for them? They are actually victims of communist rule; what they learn in school are simplified characters, severing the umbilical cord to traditional culture.

Edited by Sally Appert

Les mer:

Les hele artikkelen her
  • Merker:, ,
  • Forfatter: <a href="http://www.theepochtimes.com/n3/author/joyce-lo/" rel="author">Joyce Lo</en>, <a href="http://www.theepochtimes.com/" title="Epoch Times" rel="publisher">Epoch Times</en> og <a href="http://www.theepochtimes.com/n3/author/zhu-li/" rel="author">Zhu Li</en>, <a href="http://www.theepochtimes.com/" title="Epoch Times" rel="publisher">Epoch Times</en>
  • Kategori: Generell
mars 5, 2017

Ji Zha’s statue located in his territorial land, in today’s Shengang Town, Jiangyin City, Jiangsu Province, Kina. (Internet photo)Ji Zha’s statue located in his territorial land, in today’s Shengang Town, Jiangyin City, Jiangsu Province, Kina. (Internet photo)

Ji Zha (576-484 B.C.) was the youngest son of the King Shou Meng of Wu state, in the Spring and Autumn period of Chinese history. He was very much respected by Confucius. Confucius praised him at least four times in his teachings.

According to “Shiji”, or “The Records of the Grand Historian”, King Shou Meng had wanted Ji Zha to succeed him. derimot, Ji refused, so the King devised a succession model where his sons would become kings one after the other. derimot, Ji refused three times to his three elder brothers later in his life.

The state of Wu was located in southern China, near the mouth of Yangtze River, and was famous for producing precious swords.

En gang, King Shou Meng sent Ji Zha on a mission of visits to several states in central China.

Ji first went to the North, passing through the neighboring Xu state. The King of Xu admired the precious sword that Ji carried, but he knew that was the treasure of Wu state, and found it difficult to ask for it.

Ji Zha saw the King’s admiration. derimot, Ji still had to complete his round of visits to other states and it was protocol for him to carry his sword, so he could not give it to the King right then.

When Ji finished his mission of visits and returned through the Xu state, the King was dead.

Ji Zha generously parted with his precious sword and hung it on the pine tree next to the tomb of the King.

His guards were puzzled. Ji said: “I pledged in my heart to present this sword to him. Should I renege on my promise because he has passed away?!"

This has become a respected story passed down through the ages. Ji Zha would honor a pledge made in his mind even if it had not been spoken.

Nowadays people might revoke a verbal promise so we bind each other with written contracts. Even though these clearly set out the agreements in black and white, we still can’t guarantee that every contract will be fulfilled.

Edited by Damian Robin.

Les mer:

Les hele artikkelen her

A woman wearing Han clothing at the third  Annual Han Design Competition at Metropolitan Pavillion in New York, oktober 16, 2010. (Edward Dai / Epochtimes)A woman wearing Han clothing at the third  Annual Han Design Competition at Metropolitan Pavillion in New York, oktober 16, 2010. (Edward Dai / Epochtimes)

Zao means lees, the residue from the process of wine making. Kang means bran, the leftover coating of white rice, wheat and millet. So why do Chinese men call their wives lees and bran, the poorest feeding materials?

The origin is in “Biography of Song Hong” in Book of the Later Han, a Chinese court document covering the history of the Han Dynasty from year 6 til 189.

Song Hong was brought up near the capital city of Chang’an (modern Xi’an city) in early the Eastern Han Dynasty. He was a minister in Emperor Guangwu’s government.

In the year 26, the elder sister of the Emperor, Princess Huyang lost her husband. She wanted to re-marry and set her eyes on Song, praising him as having unparalleled virtues and outstanding appearance.

The Princess asked Emperor Guangwu to test Song’s intentions. The Emperor called in Song, while the princess hid behind a screen.

“It is said that when one becomes rich, one should look for new friends and marry a new wife. Is it a common phenomenon?” the Emperor asked Song.

Song replied: “I have only heard that one should not forget those who are willing to befriend you when you are low and poor. One cannot abandon a Zao-kang wife who has stayed by your side through tough times.” By saying this, he was refusing the Princess.

The Emperor turned around and said to the Princess: “No way!"

Siden da, men have used ‘Zao-kang wife’ as an endearment to wives who have been with them through thick and thin.

As well as being an upright officer, Song Hong was also known for his out-spoken style to the Emperor.

One day during a reception, Song observed that Emperor Guangwu kept looking at the charming beauties depicted on a screen.

He said in a serious manner; “It is difficult to find anyone who is as drawn to virtue as to lust.”

The Emperor immediately ordered the screen be removed and said with a smile, “How about one who follows good and just advice?"

Song responded, “Your Highness has improved in character. I am so pleased.”

Edited by Damian Robin.

Les hele artikkelen her

(L-R) Emperor Yao, Emperor Shun and Emperor Yu from 18th century Chinese celebrity portraits held in the National Library of France. (Public domain)(L-R) Emperor Yao, Emperor Shun and Emperor Yu from 18th century Chinese celebrity portraits held in the National Library of France. (Public domain)

During the reign of Emperor Yao, handle om 4,300 År siden, there was a great flood around the globe. The northern hemisphere was flooded up to 2,000 meters (handle om 6,600 feet) above sea level, ancient western civilizations were almost all wiped out.

At that time, the most prosperous area of the ancient Chinese civilization was in the western part of present day China, many people were living along the Kunlun Mountains in today’s Xinjiang region, lots of people escaped to the high mountains in time to survive the calamity.

The survivors saved a large quantity of prehistoric records such as the Book of Changes, the Eight Trigrams, scripts on Yin and Yang, the Five Elements, Chinese medicine, Taiji and some ancient forms of Qigong … thus China became the longest living civilized kingdom.

According to the Han Dynasty text, the “Garden of Legends”, Emperor Yao had high virtue and benevolence, he took himself as the guardian for the happiness of all. He said: “If there is one who suffers from hunger, that is my fault; if there is one who suffers from cold, it is my fault; if there is one who commits a crime, it is because I did not do well.”

In his old age, Yao abdicated to give way to Shun who also had high virtue. This was the start of the Chinese tradition of abdication in favor of another able person. When Shun got old, he followed in the footsteps of Yao and abdicated to Yu the Great who gained merit by controlling the flood.

Dan Zhu was the son of Emperor and Empress Yao. He was considered incapable and not morally fit to inherit the throne.

Emperor Yao had 10 sons, but they were all of average ability. He let his ministers recommend one who could take the post of emperor from among the nobility and civilians, they all recommended Shun from a humble upbringing.

To become the Emperor in ancient China, one had to show a divine responsibility by satisfying three conditions: to be ordained by God, to have high virtue, and to exercise great capability. Emperor Yao tested Shun in these three aspects and Shun fulfilled all. So when Yao abdicated, he felt assured that Shun would be a strong successor.

Yao said: “If I abdicate to Shun, only Dan Zhu will be unhappy. If I abdicate to Dan Zhu, that would be bad for all. I will not cause harm to all just to benefit my son.”

It’s said that Yao loved Dan Zhu very much, but Dan Zhu remained playful and would not settle down. He also talked big and was argumentative. Yao invented the master game of Go so as to train Dan Zhu.

‘Go’ is not a game focused on winning or losing, it aims to improve character and can help players understand the complementary rule of yin and yang to achieve harmony. It also helps players to become calm and enhance their temperament, morals and wisdom. After Dan Zhu took up Go he made rapid progress.

Edited by Damian Robin.

Les mer:

Les hele artikkelen her

Every household displays this Chinese character “Fu” on their doors and windows during Chinese New Year. (Epoch Times)Every household displays this Chinese character “Fu” on their doors and windows during Chinese New Year. (Epoch Times)

All Chinese people love the word “Fu – fortune”. Every household displays this Chinese character “Fu” on their doors and windows during Chinese New Year.

“Fu” represents luck, fortune, blessings – a wish for smooth sailing through life and the arrival of luck during the coming year.

According to folklore, when Jiang Ziya – a prominent character in Investiture of Gods, the classic work of Chinese fiction from the Zhou Dynasty – bestowed the posts of deities, his wife Madam Ma asked to be assigned one.

Jiang Ziya said: “Ever since you married me, we have always lived in poverty. You were predestined to be associated with poverty, so I hereby assign you to be the deity in charge of poverty!"

Ma was unhappy upon hearing this: “All deities have nice places to go; with such a title, where can I go?"

Jiang said: “You should not go to where fortune lies.”

It soon became known to the public, and as it was on the eve of the Chinese New Year, all households pinned “FU – fortune” to their doors and windows to chase away the “deity of poverty”.

Ever since then, it has become the traditional habit to use pin-ups of “Fu” at Chinese New Year.

The Chinese Character “Fu” in Oracle bone script. (Epoch Times)

The character”Fu” in Oracle bone script, the earliest ancient writing, depicts a high alter table on the left for displaying offerings to Gods, while on the right of the character, two hands hold a barrel of wine − as if bringing it to the alter − as an offering, as an expression of gratitude and good fortune.

This character was present from the earliest origins of Chinese writings.

Les hele artikkelen her