(Zhiching Chen/Epoch Times)(Zhiching Chen/Epoch Times)

It seems like every week there’s another news story about a small dispute erupting into extreme violence, or even murder.

We’ve all seen the shocking headlines, tel que “Man charged with trying to kill co-worker with wrench” and “Neighbor feud escalates to weed whacker attack.”

“How could anyone be so insane and irrational?” we may think smugly to ourselves. Bien sûr, these are extreme examples. Yet we can all relate to losing control at some point, whether it’s a harsh word to a spouse or a verbal tirade against a driver who cut us off.

(Pixabay.com)

(Pixabay.com)

It’s easy to blame the other person or vent your anger, but the ancient Chinese had a different way to resolve inevitable social tension: tolérance.

Letting other people mess with your inner peace is giving them too much power, the thinking went. Better to forgive others’ mistakes and be understanding of their human flaws. By showing mercy, it could also have the effect of changing the other person by touching their heart, or even uplifting society. pendant ce temps, if you can manage to keep calm in the face of injustice, you remain the master of your own domain and keep your inner peace intact.

Here are some legendary stories of great tolerance from traditional Chinese culture. They may just give you inspiration the next time your coworker steals your lunch from the office fridge.

What to Do If Your Neighbor Destroys Your Garden … the Ancient Chinese Way

(Lionel Rich/Wikimedia Commons/CC-BY-SA-2.0)

(Lionel Rich/Wikimedia Commons/CC-BY-SA-2.0)

Song Jiu was a governor in the state of Liang during the Warring States Period (722 B.C. à 481 B.C.) in ancient China. Adjacent to Liang was the state of Chu, and the border between the two states was marked by a post. Melon farmers from each state worked the land on their own side of the post.
The Liang people were industrious and frequently irrigated their land, so their melons grew big and flourished. But the Chu people were lazy. They hardly ever watered their land, so their melons were small and shriveled.
Out of jealousy, one night the Chu people crossed over to the other side and stomped on the Liang people’s melon vines, breaking many of them. Le jour suivant, when the Liang people discovered the damage, they were enraged and reported it to Governor Song, seeking revenge.
Song shook his head and said, “We should not do that. Making an enemy is a path to calamity. It is narrow-minded to give tit for tat.”

Au lieu, Song devised a plan: A team of the Liang people would be sent to secretly water the Chu’s melon patch every night. But it had to be a secret, he insisted; no one must tell the Chus.

The next morning, when the Chu people went out to check their crop, they saw that it had already been watered. With the covert help from the Liang people, the Chu state’s melon vines grew better and better every day. The Chu people thought it strange and started to investigate. When they discovered that the Liang people had been helping them, they were very moved and reported it to their government.

The Chu king subsequently apologized to the Liang people with generous gifts, vowing friendship between the two states. The Liang and Chu then developed a great and long-lasting alliance.

For centuries, Song Jiu’s wisdom and broadmindedness have been remembered, and the story of how he repaid an act of harm with an act of kindness has been passed down through the ages.

Resolving a Property Dispute Like an Ancient Chinese Prime Minister

(Annie Theby/Unsplash.com)

(Annie Theby/Unsplash.com)

In Tongcheng County, Aihui Province, en Chine, there is a famous lane about 100 meters long and two meters wide. It is called “Six Feet Lane” and has a beautiful story behind it.

Zhang Ying, a well-known officer who lived during the Qing Dynasty, was born in Tongcheng County. Beside his house was a piece of vacant land, and his neighbor built a wall on it to claim ownership. Zhang’s family argued with the neighbor about the wall, but without resolution.

À l'époque, Zhang was the prime minister of the state and living in the capital city. His family members sent him a letter asking him to intervene on the land dispute. When Zhang read the letter, he wrote a short poem in reply:

Over thousands of miles the letter travelled, only for a wall;

What of letting him have three feet more?

The Great Wall is still firm and strong,

But where are the whereabouts of Emperor Qin?

Qin Shi Huang, the first emperor of China. (NTD)

Qin Shi Huang, the first emperor of China. (NTD)

The Great Wall was built under the order of the first emperor of the Qin Dynasty some 2,000 years before the Qing Dynasty. By mentioning this history, Zhang meant to explain to his family that life is too valuable and short to fight for insignificant material things.

Upon seeing this poem, his relatives felt ashamed. They immediately followed Zhang’s instruction and yielded three feet of land to the neighbor, who in turn was so moved by Zhang’s humility and demeanor that he gave up three feet of his own property, thus creating a six-foot lane. This story of tolerance has been passed down from generation to generation in China.

How to Handle Threats and Gossip Like an Ancient Chinese Diplomat

(Ben White/Unsplash.com)

(Ben White/Unsplash.com)

Lin Xiangru was a diplomat of the Zhao state during the Warring States Period who eventually worked his way up to prime minister. His fast success drew the ire of General Lian Po, who was forced to take orders from Lin.

Lian Po was resentful and said publicly: “I am a general and I earned my status by conquering many cities. Lin Xiangru got a higher position just by talking. I shall embarrass him when I see him.”

Hearing of Lian’s threats, Lin remained unmoved and made it a point to avoid a confrontation, including steering clear of Lian’s entourage when he saw it coming.

Lin’s squires mistakenly thought that Lin was afraid of the general. They told him, “Although your position is higher than that of General Lian Po, you are afraid of him and try to avoid him. Even an ordinary person would be ashamed to do that. Please grant us our leave.”

Lin firmly invited them to stay and laid out the reason for his reaction to Lian’s threats.

He first asked, “Who do you think is more powerful: General Lian Po or the king of Qin?"

The squires agreed that it was the king of Qin, bien sûr, as the Qin state was very powerful at the time.

Lin then said, “I dared to argue with the king of Qin and scold him. Why would I be afraid of General Lian?"

Lin further explained: “General Lian and I are the reason the state of Qin has not dared to invade our state. Two tigers cannot coexist if they fight. I tolerate his behavior because I place the welfare of the nation over my own personal pride.”

After he learned of Lin’s words, Lian Po was ashamed and quickly came to apologize. “I am humbled by your generosity. I did not expect you to be so tolerant of me!” he told Lin.

All resentment between the two dissolved and they became close friends.

Being able to correct one’s mistakes has been considered a virtue since ancient times. People praised General Lian Po for having the strength of character to sincerely repent and mend his ways. Lin Xiangru was also admired for taking a tolerant attitude during conflict, placing the nation’s interests above personal pride.

The Ocean of Tolerance

(Davdeka/Shutterstock)

(Davdeka/Shutterstock)

Tolerance is one of the most important virtues in traditional Chinese culture. Reflecting selflessness, sagesse, and a broad mind, it comes from self-discipline and is the natural manifestation of kindness, la compassion, et la bienveillance. It brings people closer together by improving their relationships.

Back in ancient times, sages and men of virtue held others’ perspectives in high regard. They thought of others first when they encountered difficulty, and were respected role models who set lofty examples for others.

 Laozi (Zona Yeh/Epoch Times)

Laozi (Zona Yeh/Epoch Times)

Laozi, a venerable sage from ancient China, taught that a person with great virtue is able to behave in an all-encompassing manner in harmony with the “Tao,” or the “Great Way.” He said: “The reason great rivers and oceans are broad and deep is that they seek the lowest level so as to take in all the water from the streams and creeks.”

This has the meaning that in order to fully embrace and be inclusive of all things, one must have a compassionate heart. The more broadminded one is, the greater the world one encompasses.

People with great virtue are totally unselfish and hold themselves to a high moral standard. They are more kind, tolerant, and willing to help and care for others, and would never be influenced by self-interest and self-profit.

So the next time conflicts occur, picture that ocean with unlimited capacity that takes in all water from the rivers and creeks. We can be that ocean.

Read the full article here
  • Tags:,
  • Author: <a href="http://www.theepochtimes.com/n3/author/epoch-times-staff/" rel="author">La Grande Époque</une>
  • Category: General

Les cinq éléments de la philosophie chinoise et leurs interactions. (Parnasse / CC BY-SA 3.0)Les cinq éléments de la philosophie chinoise et leurs interactions. (Parnasse / CC BY-SA 3.0)

Trois classiques de caractère, ou San Zi Jing, est le plus connu du texte chinois classique pour les enfants. Écrit par Wang Yinlian (1223-1296) au cours de la dynastie des Song, il a été mémorisé par des générations de Chinois, jeunes et vieux. Jusqu'à ce que les années 1800, Trois classiques de caractère a été le premier texte que chaque enfant étudierait.

rythmique de texte, court, et simples vers trois caractères autorisés pour la lecture et la mémorisation facile. Cela a permis aux enfants d'apprendre les caractères communs, structures grammaticales, les leçons de l'histoire chinoise, et surtout comment se conduire.

Les cinq éléments, un concept central dans la compréhension traditionnelle chinoise des caractéristiques naturelles et des changements, caractéristiques de la San Zi Jing:

Nous parlons du printemps et en été, nous parlons de l'automne et l'hiver.
Ces quatre saisons tournent sans cesse.

Nous parlons du nord et au sud, nous parlons de l'est et à l'ouest.
Ces quatre directions correspondent à la position centrale.

Nous parlons de l'eau, Feu, bois, métal et la terre.
Ces cinq éléments ont leur origine dans la numérologie.

Nous parlons de bienveillance et de justice, de propriété, de la sagesse, et de l'intégrité.
Ces cinq vertus ne doivent jamais être compromis.

History’s greatest physicists, like Stephen Hawking and Albert Einstein, spent their lives seeking a unified “theory of everything.” This is the Holy Grail that explains everything in the universe—from the workings of the human brain, to the formation of mountains and seas and the birth and death of planets and stars.

Il est intéressant de, thousands of years ago, the ancient Chinese already had their own “theory of everything”—the Five Elements, an abstract theory based on the Chinese numerology rules of the I-Ching, the Book of Changes.

The theory expounds that five elements—metal, bois, eau, Feu, earth – constitute all things in our universe. Niché dans la théorie est le concept de croissance mutuelle et d'inhibition mutuelle - chaque élément un de ses favorise frères et inhibe une autre.

Par exemple, l'eau contribue à la croissance du bois, et les combustibles bois feu. Mais le feu fait fondre le métal, et de l'eau désaltère feu. Ensemble, les éléments se tiennent mutuellement en échec, le maintien d'un équilibre harmonieux des forces.

Faussement simple sur la surface, les cinq éléments de la théorie contient plusieurs niveaux de complexité et d'abstraction, ce qui rend si polyvalent qu'il peut appliquer à presque tous les aspects de la vie. De la médecine traditionnelle chinoise, la musique, cuisine, géomancie, architecture, à la philosophie, cette théorie qui englobe la culture chinoise harmonisée.

Tablette, en chinois et en mandchou, pour les dieux des cinq éléments du Temple du Ciel.  (Vmenkov / CC-BY SA 3.0)

Tablette, en chinois et en mandchou, pour les dieux des cinq éléments du Temple du Ciel. (Vmenkov / CC-BY SA 3.0)

Arts et architecture

Comme un roman de Dan Brown, le symbolisme des cinq éléments est omniprésente dans les arts et l'architecture chinoise, mais invisibles à l'œil unknowing. Tout cela est rendu plus clair lorsque nous comprenons les symboles associés à chaque élément.

La cité interdite, le palais impérial chinois, est construit dans des teintes riches de vert, jaune, et rouge. Mais ces couleurs ne sont pas simplement choisis pour le plaisir esthétique - ils représentent les éléments en bois, Terre, Feu et respectivement, et leur nouvelle de bon augure associés.

Les murs rouges Cité Interdite annoncent la prospérité et festiveness de l'élément Feu. Les toits jaunes symbolisent l'élément Terre, et la Terre est pensé pour représenter le centre de l'univers. couleur jaune de la Terre symbolise ainsi la position centrale du pouvoir de l'empereur. De la même manière, the emperor’s traditional robe is also in the imperial shade of yellow.

But not all the roofs in the City are yellow – the princes’ palaces are roofed with green tiles, which represent the Wood element. As Wood symbolizes growth and vitality, it is an apt symbol for growing teenagers.

The Imperial Library is in an unusual shade of black, a color that some would consider inauspicious. But black is associated with the element Water, and water – which also represents winter and storage – symbolically protects the library’s highly flammable treasury of books.

Cuisine and Medicine

The five elements theory forms the core of both Chinese cuisine and traditional medicine, as it aims to achieve a “harmony or balance” of tastes and body energies. Each element is associated with a flavor, a vital body organ, and an energy property.

Par exemple, metal is associated with pungent or spicy flavors, the lungs, and the property of dryness. Why does spicy hot pot taste so comforting during the cold and wet monsoon season? According to theory, spicy foods are strong in the Metal element, and counteract the climate with their drying and cold-dispersing properties. Herbs like ginger, garlic, onion, and mustard reduce congestion in the lungs, stimulate circulation and enhance appetite – perfect for cold and wet weather.

But when the hot and dry season comes around, we crave sweet and cooling foods like mung bean soup, barley water, herbal chin chow and tau huay. That’s because these foods have the damp, sweet properties of Earth and the cooling properties of Water, pour lutter contre le climat chaud et le séchage.

Vraiment une bonne cuisine chinoise cherche à atteindre l'harmonie parfaite des aliments et des saveurs qui favorisent la vitalité et la longévité. Par exemple, moelleux cuit à la vapeur pétoncles frais, qui contiennent les propriétés salées et de refroidissement de l'élément de l'eau, sont parfaitement complétés par le goût épicé et le réchauffement de l'ail, le gingembre et les oignons verts à partir de l'élément métallique.

Dans la même veine, La médecine traditionnelle chinoise souligne que les symptômes et les signes pathologiques reflètent un déséquilibre dans les organes et leurs énergies du corps, dont chacun peut être mis en correspondance avec les différentes parties du système de cinq éléments.

Cela étant dit, ce qui précède est simplement une simplification grossière de la cuisine chinoise et la médecine. Pendant des milliers d'années, ces systèmes sont beaucoup plus complexes et sophistiqués, and are all based on a conceptually fundamental “theory of everything”.

The Five Constants of Confucianism

Nous parlons de bienveillance et de justice, de propriété, de la sagesse, et de l'intégrité.
Ces cinq vertus ne doivent jamais être compromis.

The principle behind the five elements has also been applied to Chinese philosophy, in particular to the Five Constants of Confucianism.

Two hundred years after the original Confucianism in the pre-Qin dynasty era, Confucianism was elevated to official ideology during the Han Dynasty. Represented by the iconic philosopher Dong Zhongshu, this system of thought integrated the theory of Yin-Yang and the five elements.

Dong Zhongshu believed that universe was governed by the laws of Yin-Yang and the five elements, and man should also conform to these laws. He pioneered the concept that the five constants or virtues corresponded to the five element theory, as follows:

Benevolence – Wood, for its growing and giving nature
Righteousness – Metal, for its strength and unyielding power
Propriety – Water, for its yielding and deferential nature
Wisdom –Fire, for its brightness
Integrity – Earth, for its solid and grounded nature

Like the harmonious balance of the five elements, man should possess all five virtues on a fundamental level. But at the societal level, Dong believed that each strata of society should have a specific coordination of values in order for society to function at its best.

Par exemple, persons of high rank should place emphasis on benevolence, convenance, and integrity. Being in a position of power over countless others, rulers should have benevolence to ensure that the populace was cared for.

Those of lower rank, like the common people or children in the family, mettre l'accent sur la justice devrait, sagesse, and integrity. La sagesse est la connaissance de la morale, sans laquelle on ne peut pas devenir une personne de la vertu. Réception de l'éducation morale doit être une priorité parmi les jeunes.

tous les rangs, toutefois, mettre l'accent sur l'intégrité devrait. Comme l'élément Terre, Dong a estimé que l'intégrité est la base pour les quatre autres vertus, et que sans l'honnêteté et l'intégrité des autres vertus affaiblirait et crumble.

idées philosophiques de Dong sur la cosmologie et la gouvernance sont immortalisés dans son travail, Luxuriant rosée du printemps et d'automne Annals, qui a été écrit par lui-même et avec d'autres auteurs. Ses idées ont été largement acceptées et ont fait la philosophie orthodoxe de la gouvernance de la Chine pour plusieurs centaines d'années.

Read the full article here
  • Tags:,
  • Author: <a href="http://www.theepochtimes.com/n3/author/jade-pearce/" rel="author">Jade Pearce</une>, The Epoch Times
  • Category: General

Yang Zhen was a fair and honest official who lived during the Eastern Han Dynasty. (The Epoch Times)Yang Zhen was a fair and honest official who lived during the Eastern Han Dynasty. (The Epoch Times)

The “Standards for Being a Good Student and Child” (Di Zi Gui) is a traditional Chinese textbook for children that teaches children morals and proper etiquette. It was written by Li Yuxiu in the Qing Dynasty, during the reign of Emperor Kang Xi (1661-1722). Dans cette série, we present some ancient Chinese stories that exemplify the valuable lessons taught in the third chapter of Di Zi Gui—”Caution in Daily Life.”

The Di Zi Gui shows the importance of minding details when in movement or taking action:

Unravel curtains slowly
Without causing noise
Make turns widely
Without hitting corners

When holding an empty vessel
Hold it as as though it were full
When entering an empty room
Enter as though it were occupied.

As cryptic as this sounds, this actually teaches an important principle – that we should still conduct ourselves properly, even when no one is around to see it or when we are not being watched by others.

This virtue is embodied by the ancient Chinese scholar Yang Zhen, who refused to accept a gift of gold even though no one else was around.

Refusing a Gift of Gold at Midnight

Yang Zhen was a celebrated scholar of the Eastern Han Dynasty. Yang Zhen lost his father at a young age, and grew up in poverty. But he had a passion for studying and was very diligent, accumulating a wealth of knowledge and becoming a learned scholar. En fait, there was a popular saying among the scholars at the time that “Yang Zhen is the Confucius of the Guanxi area”

Yang Zhen taught for over 20 years before he eventually became a government official. Because he was over fifty years old at the time, Beaucoup de gens, including Yang Zhen himself, did not expect him to be accepted for an official position. But Yang Zhen’s good reputation became known to General Deng Zhi, who invited him to become an official. Plus tard, Yang Zhen became the prefect of Jinzhou County and Donglai County.

Yang Zhen was very fair and honest, and did not seek personal gain. He held himself strictly to the principle of being an “official with clean hands,” or one who was uncorrupted.

What are you saying? Heaven knows, Earth knows, tu sais, and I know. How can you say that no one else knows?Though no one else is here, isn’t our conscience here?

— Yang Zhen, upon refusing a bribe

While serving as prefect of Jinzhou, Yang met a man Wang Mi whom he found was very talented. So under his recommendation, Wang Mi was promoted to the position of magistrate of Changyi County.

Plus tard, Yang Zhen was promoted to the position of prefect of Donglai County. On his way to Donglai, he passed by Changyi, where he was warmly welcomed by Wang Mi.

In the evening, Wang Mi paid a visit to Yang Zhen. The two men were absorbed in pleasant conversation for many hours, until they realized how late it was. As Wang Mi was about to leave, he took out some gold and said, “It is a rare opportunity to see you, my great mentor. I have prepared a little gift to express my gratitude for your guidance.”

Yang Zhen replied, “Because I knew of your talents, I recommended you for an official position, hoping that you could be fair and incorrupt. What you did just now was against my expectations of you. The best way you can repay me is by serving the country well, instead of giving me anything.”

However, Wang Mi insisted, “It’s the middle of night, no one else will know about this except you and me. Please accept it.”

Yang Zhen immediately became very stern and said, “What are you saying? Heaven knows, Earth knows, tu sais, and I know. How can you say that no one else knows?Though no one else is here, isn’t our conscience here?"

En entendant cela, Wang Mi reddened with embarrassment and left hastily with his gold.

Plus tard, Yang Zhen was transferred to Zhuo County. He was very fair and just, and his whole family lived a simple life.
Ses amis ont essayé de le persuader de quitter une propriété à sa descendance, mais il a répondu avec un sourire, « Je quitte ma réputation d'être un fonctionnaire incorruptible en héritage à mes enfants, est-ce pas assez richesses que?"

Il est facile d'obéir à ses principes éthiques devant les autres mais il est difficile de se comporter toujours quand on est seul. Le refus de Yang Zhen du don d'or démontre son esprit exemplaire de rester debout et honnête, même quand il n'est pas surveillée par d'autres, une valeur qui vaut la peine d'apprentissage de.

Guan Ning jette l'or dans le Rizière

Et la concentration sont Conscienciosité importants lorsque vous effectuez des tâches. Le Di Zi va Gui:

Ne vous précipitez pas toute question
Hâte signifie beaucoup d'erreurs

Ne crains pas la chose difficile
Ni demander des conseils ou de clarifier les doutes

Un bon exemple est la figure historique Guan Ning, qui était connu pour être très concentré dans son travail et la culture spirituelle.

Guan Ning était un érudit au cours de la période des Trois Royaumes. Depuis l'enfance, il a développé l'habitude de faire les choses avec une grande prudence et la concentration.

Guan Ning avait un camarade de classe appelé Hua Xin, et les deux utilisés pour étudier et ferme ensemble. Un jour, alors que Guan Ning a été binage du riz paddy, il a frappé sur un rocher qui se révèle être une pépite d'or. Il a jeté l'or sur le riz paddy et a continué binage.

Hua Xin a vu Guan Ning jeter la pépite d'or et il a ramassé. Il a examiné sous tous les angles, puis regarda son camarade de classe pendant longtemps avant lui aussi décidé de le jeter.

Pourquoi est-ce Guan Ning jeter la pépite d'or? Ce fut parce qu'il était un homme de vertu. Il a traité l'agriculture dans le cadre de sa pratique de la culture et a salué les difficultés de l'agriculture que la joie. Il a vu la pépite d'or, qui lui fournirait une vie confortable, comme un test et la distraction de son travail agricole, et donc de sa pratique de la culture.

Guan Ning coupe le tapis

Guan Ning coupe son tapis pour signaler la fin d'une amitié.

Guan Ning coupe son tapis pour signaler la fin d'une amitié.

À une autre occasion, les deux amis étudiaient ensemble quand ils ont entendu le son des tambours et des gongs en dehors de leur fenêtre. Le bruit était d'une grande procession des fonctionnaires de haut rang et leur passage des gardes d'honneur par.

Guan Ning a continué de se concentrer sur son livre, mais Hua Xin pouvait difficilement rester assis. finalement, il ne pouvait pas résister, mais aller à l'extérieur pour assister à la procession, jusqu'à ce que le cortège avait marché loin.

Lorsque Hua Xin retour, Guan Ning took out a knife and cut the mat they had sat on together in half, en disant, “We should no longer be friends.”

Confucius once said, “Do not work with people who have different values from yours.” Mo Zi also once said, “One who stays near ink gets stained black”, meaning that one will inevitably be influenced by the behavior of one’s company.

After observing Hua Xin’s behavior in various situations, Guan Ning realized that they differed too much in personality. Hua Xin was easily distracted by money and power, and was careless in his attitude to studying, which would have made it more difficult for Guan Ning to maintain his own focus in his work.

Donc, Guan Ning cut the mat in half, and made the decision to stay away from Hua Xin. À partir de maintenant, “breaking up with a friend by severing the mat” became an idiom referring to the end of a friendship.

Read the full article here

Trois classiques de caractère, ou San Zi Jing, est le plus connu du texte chinois classique pour les enfants. Écrit par Wang Yinlian (1223-1296) au cours de la dynastie des Song, il a été mémorisé par des générations de Chinois, jeunes et vieux. Jusqu'à ce que les années 1800, Trois classiques de caractère a été le premier texte que chaque enfant étudierait.

rythmique de texte, court, et simples vers trois caractères autorisés pour la lecture et la mémorisation facile. Cela a permis aux enfants d'apprendre les caractères communs, structures grammaticales, les leçons de l'histoire chinoise, et surtout comment se conduire.

However, après la Révolution culturelle en Chine, le classique de trois caractères a été interdit et a fini par tomber en désuétude. Dans cette série, nous faire revivre et revue ce grand classique chinois, en tirant les leçons anciennes de la sagesse pour nos vies modernes.

The Three Character Classic Says:

Begin with filial piety and fraternal love,
and then see and hear.
Learn to count,
and learn to read.

Units and tens,
tens and hundreds,
hundreds and thousands,
thousands and tens of thousands.

The Three Forces
are Heaven, Earth and Man.
The Three Luminaries
are the sun, the moon and the stars.

The Three Bonds
are the obligation between sovereign and subject,
the love between father and child,
the harmony between husband and wife.

Begin with filial piety and fraternal love, and then see and hear.

— Three Character Classic

After teaching young readers the fundamentals of being a good child and sibling, the Three Character Classic devotes a good amount of text to the basics of mathematics and numbers.

But it does more than teach kids how to solve “one plus one”. While teaching counting, the Three Character Classic associates each number with a fundamental piece of knowledge about nature, geography, société, et la culture.

According to the ancient divination text I-Ching, there are three forces or “talents” in our environment – Heaven, Terre, and Man. The person who knows all three well is an all-rounded individual.

There are three sources of light that illuminate our skies – the sun, the moon and the stars. There are four seasons, and four directions – North, Sud, East and West.

The numbers serve as a useful memory aid, aider les enfants à rassembler et à se rappeler des listes comme les cinq éléments et les sept émotions dans la culture chinoise.

Les chiffres sont des choses fondamentales que même les jeunes enfants les connaissent par cœur. Mais quand est-ce que les Chinois développent des chiffres, et combien ont-ils réussi dans leur système de mathématiques et numeration?

L'origine des chiffres chinois

Selon la légende chinoise, le numéro un (A) a été inventé par Fu Xi, le premier empereur mythique de la Chine, plus de 5,000 il y a des années. Les numéros restants ont été créés sur les 500 ans plus tard par Cangjie, l'inventeur des caractères chinois.

Juste après, Li Shou, un historien de l'Empereur Jaune, a développé le système de numération décimale où dix sont des dizaines cent; dix mille sont des centaines; etc.

légendes de côté, les premières preuves physiques des chiffres chinois remonte à la dynastie Shang (14e siècle avant notre ère), plus de 3,000 il y a des années. les chiffres chinois ont été trouvés gravés sur des carapaces de tortue et des os de bovins plat - également connu sous le nom d'os d'oracle.

Pendant ce temps, les Chinois utilisaient déjà des symboles individuels pour les numéros un à neuf, ce qui indique que les Chinois étaient parmi les premières civilisations à utiliser un système de numération décimale.

Le système de numérotation décimal est le système le plus largement utilisé par les civilisations modernes. Cela inclut le système de numérotation que nous utilisons aujourd'hui - le système hindou-arabe.

mathématiciens chinois ont pu calculer des racines carrées et cubiques de nombres à plusieurs décimales.

— Three Character Classic

Autour de 4ème siècle avant JC, le premier système de numération décimale de position chinoise a également développé du monde - barres de comptage - pour faciliter les calculs.

Ce système a prouvé extrêmement efficace, et les mathématiciens chinois ont pu calculer des racines carrées et cubiques de nombres à plusieurs décimales. Par 500 AD ils avaient obtenu la valeur de pi à 3.14159267, mille ans d'avance sur leurs homologues européens. Ils ont également été les premiers à découvrir et prouver « Triangle de Pascal » - 300 ans avant Pascal est né!

Équilibre entre les « trois relations »

Les trois obligations sont l'obligation entre souverain et sujet, the love between father and child, the harmony between husband and wife.

— Three Character Classic

Parmi les « ensembles de trois » que les trois caractères classiques enseigne sont les trois obligations ou trois relations - les relations entre la règle et sujet, entre parents et enfants, et entre les couples.

Ces trois relations sont les relations les plus importantes chez les hommes et les femmes, selon l'idéologie confucéenne. If these three relationships are handled well, one will enjoy peace and harmony. But if these relationships are handled poorly, one’s life will be in chaos.

One historic person who handled the three relationships well was Xu Yun, military general for the State of Wei during the Three Kingdoms Period. However, Xu Yun very nearly failed to achieve this, if not for his intelligent wife.

When he was a young man, Xu Yun was match-made to Lady Ruan, the daughter of Ruan Gong. But after the wedding ceremony, Xu Yun was shocked to see how plain and unattractive his new wife was under her wedding veil. He refused to enter the bridal chamber, and to the chagrin of his family, asked for a marriage annulment.

It took a fair amount of convincing by Xu’s family before Xu entered the bridal chamber. Mais en voyant sa fiancée, Xu pourrait supporter plus et tourné à quitter. Sachant qu'il ne reviendra pas, sa femme l'arrêta en tirant sur sa robe.

Pour mettre dans l'embarras de sa femme, Xu Yun a déclaré dérisoirement, « Sur les quatre vertus féminines - caractère féminin, compétences, discours, et l'apparence - combien possédez-vous?"

Sa femme a répondu, « Ce que je manque est tout simplement la beauté. Un savant doit avoir cent vertus. Combien possédez-vous, mon mari?"

Xu Yun dit fièrement, "Tous."

Sa femme intelligente continue, « Le caractère est le plus important pour tous les milieux. Mon Seigneur, vous désirez beauté, pas bon caractère. Comment pouvez-vous prétendre que vous avez toutes les vertus d'un savant?"

Xu Yun a été profondément honte après avoir entendu les paroles de sa femme. He changed his attitude and henceforth showed the greatest respect toward his wife. He eventually rose through the ranks to become a loyal military general, and raised two sons who also became government officials.

Read the full article here
  • Tags:,
  • Author: <a href="http://www.theepochtimes.com/n3/author/jade-pearce/" rel="author">Jade Pearce</une>, The Epoch Times
  • Category: General

“Court Ladies Wearing Flowered Headdresses,” by Zhou Fang. Silk hand scroll, 18 inches by 71 pouces, Liaoning Provincial Museum, Shenyang Province, China. (Domaine public)“Court Ladies Wearing Flowered Headdresses,” by Zhou Fang. Silk hand scroll, 18 inches by 71 pouces, Liaoning Provincial Museum, Shenyang Province, China. (Domaine public)

Whether worn by or the First Lady, celebrities at the Oscars, or society women at a Met Gala, high fashion appeals to us. Some believe that high fashion originated in the 15th century French Burgundian court, but looking back as early as the eighth century in China, the fashionable female had already been a favorite subject in art.

During the Tang Dynasty (618–907), une période dans la civilisation chinoise qui a une économie stable et une culture florissante, le genre de « belles femmes peinture » a atteint des sommets considérables. Et le classement ci-dessus tous les maîtres Tang pour stylisation la plus grande dans la représentation de la figure féminine a été Zhou Fang. Son défilement exquis à la main en soie « Cour dames portant Flowered Coiffes » (au Musée provincial du Liaoning dans la province chinoise de Shenyang) est un joyau rare qui nous permet d'entrevoir la réalisation remarquable non seulement l'art du portrait féminin Tang, mais de la mode à l'époque.

Dans cette pièce, Zhou Fang dépeint cinq dames de la cour avec une soubrette. Nous voyons les dames se tiennent à côté de l'autre jetant les yeux sur les chiens, une fleur rouge, une grue, un papillon, et un arbre de magnolia en fleurs.

À droite, deux dames jouent avec un chien et une dame, il taquine avec un chiffon à poussière. Au milieu, nous voyons une autre dame de la cour en admirant une fleur rouge dans ses mains pendant une grue flâne passé. Une soubrette est titulaire d'un ventilateur et apparaît plus petite, (non pas parce que d'essayer de montrer la profondeur physique, mais plutôt en raison d'une échelle hiérarchique intentionnelle qui signifie son statut inférieur).

À gauche, une dame de la cour, les mains jointes ajoute une impression de profondeur à la composition. Une autre dame se tient à côté d'un arbre de magnolia en fleurs et tout comme elle attrape un papillon, elle déplace son attention sur un chien qui court vers elle.

Il y a une grande intimité entre les dames de la cour et les entités non humaines qu'ils tiennent compagnie. Their relationship can be interpreted to represent the pleasant past times of the carefree life of noble women in the imperial palace. Ironiquement, a mood of languor and a sense of poignancy permeate the ladies’ countenances, as perhaps they share each other’s loneliness.

Feminine fashion and beauty of the Tang dynasty can also be perceived through this piece. The rounded faces and slightly plump figures (by today’s standards) represent the idealized sense of Tang feminine beauty. Their fair complexions are a result of the powdered white pigment applied to their faces. Their eyebrows are depicted like butterfly wings while their mouths are painted as cherry-like lips. Élevés étaient aussi caractéristiques coiffures des femmes de l'aristocratie Tang et étaient souvent ornés de fleurs de lotus et de pivoines ou d'ornements d'or (jinbuyao).

Sous leurs gazes de soie délicates peuvent être vues à long, robes élégantes brodés de motifs floraux et de motifs géométriques. Zhou Fang utilise des couleurs riches de rouge, cramoisi, et ocre pour la robe sous-jacente alors que sa palette de couleurs présente un tons plus sobres pour représenter la translucidité de la toile. L'encolure relativement faible, près de manches au sol, et foulards larges portés comme étoles ou drapées à travers les bras sont caractéristiques de la mode haute cour de la dynastie des Tang.

Les fleurs qui ornent les cheveux des dames parlent le titre de cette pièce. Que ce soit porter des fleurs dans leurs cheveux ou en tenir une dans leurs mains, the court ladies seem to admire the beauty of the blossoms. Feminine beauty and the flower became one as they both evoked the ephemeral nature of youth. Just as a flower wilts, youth and beauty fade.

Famous Tang poets like Li Bai, frequently juxtaposed these two ideas in their poems. Literary accounts have also revealed that the Tang emperor Xuanzong would release a butterfly during his springtime banquets and choose a partner based on whose flower it landed on.

Mike Cai is a 2012 graduate from the New York Fei Tian Academy of the Arts in 2012 and currently attends University of California–Berkeley.

Read the full article here

Su Shi, also known as Su Dongpo, was a famous poet and gastronome of the Song dynasty, who practiced the philosophy of “eating with moderation”.Su Shi, also known as Su Dongpo, was a famous poet and gastronome of the Song dynasty, who practiced the philosophy of “eating with moderation”.

The “Standards for Being a Good Student and Child” (Di Zi Gui) is a traditional Chinese textbook for children that teaches children morals and proper etiquette. It was written by Li Yuxiu in the Qing Dynasty, during the reign of Emperor Kang Xi (1661-1722). Dans cette série, we present some ancient Chinese stories that exemplify the valuable lessons taught in the third chapter of Di Zi Gui—”Caution in Daily Life.”

The Di Zi Gui teaches us not just to be careful in how we dress and carry ourselves, but how we should behave when dining and appearance.

As regards food and drink,
Do not be picky and choosy
Eat as needed, and not to excess

When still of young age
Do not take alcohol
Getting drunk from drink
Is a most ugly of sights

Eating and drinking in moderation is a good habit to develop from young, as maintaining a simple diet provides the long-term benefits of a healthy life. This is best exemplified by the two ancient Chinese wise men, Su Shi and Ji Kang, who followed simple and healthy dietary habits to positive effect.

Su Shi: Content With a Lifestyle of Moderation

The great poet Su Shi (蘇軾), also known as Su Dongpo, was also one of the greatest gastronomes in the history of Chinese food culture. He made many contributions to the development of Chinese cuisine, wine and tea.

Besides his profound understanding of cuisine, Su Shi’s philosophy of eating in moderation is also a good practice for us to learn from.

One time, Su Shi was demoted and sent away from his hometown. As he was leaving his hometown, he met his brother Su Zhe. The two brothers bought some simple soup and rice at a food stall by the roadside, to share a final meal.

But the food tasted terrible. Further saddened by the fact that he would soon have to bid goodbye to his brother, Su Zhe stared gloomily at his food and put down his chopsticks with a huge sigh.

pendant ce temps, Su Shi had already finished all of his portion of the food. Su Shi said lightly to Su Zhe, “Brother, we are already in times of misfortune. Just make do with the food. It isn’t so terrible after all.” Su Zhe was very ashamed after hearing this.

Su Shi believed that people should be moderate in their appetites. Il a dit, “Even ambrosia tastes like grass when one is not hungry. One should only eat when hungry, so that ordinary food can be very tasty.”

His self-restrained, simple lifestyle and philosophical attitude enabled him to always smile through all his ups and downs in life.

Ji Kang’s Theory of Preserving Health

Ji Kang (嵇康, 224–263 AD) was a famous Chinese author and philosopher. He advocated the Taoist teachings of Lao Zi and Zhuang Zi, and believed in the ‘Tao’ of diet and preserving health. One of his best-known works is his “Essay on Nourishing Life” or Yang Sheng Lun (養生論), which primarily explains the way to preserve one’s health.

In his work, Ji Kang provides complete theories and methods for health preservation, including methods for preserving the mind. He discusses how mental health affects physical health. He postulated that one’s body is akin to a kingdom, while one’s spirit is akin to the kingdom’s ruler. En tant que tel, preserving health requires both nourishing the body and the spirit, of which nourishing the spirit is more important.

He said that one should ‘shape character to maintain the state of mind, and keep a peaceful mind to preserve the whole body’, affirming the significance of preserving mental health.

Ji Kang’s suggested health preservation method involves overcoming one’s desire for wealth, fame, and rich, decadent food. This enabled one’s mind to be calm and at peace; to be full of vigor and far from sadness and worry.

Ji Kang also emphasized that one must be self-disciplined in developing good habits and staying away from evil temptations, in order to achieve good health. He pointed out that those who are good at preserving health understand one thing: that pursuing fame and wealth eventually harms the heart and body. Donc, they learn to take fame and wealth lightly, and neither desire nor pursue it.

A person who takes fame and wealth lightly has inner peace, whereas a person who withholds himself from fame and wealth reluctantly only feels worry and pain. It is obvious that the former is better for health than the latter.

As for rich-tasting foods, Ji Kang proposed that people should make healthy eating a habit and a way of life, and should keep away from rich food so that they are not tempted by it. Ce, il a dit, is better than facing rich food and struggling to control their urge to eat.

The Right Posture and Body Language to Show (and Earn) Respect

One of the important lessons mentioned in Di Zi Gui is how we should carry ourselves in our day-to-day activities. It is said in the text:

With a relaxed gait
And posture upright
Bow deep and round
Pay your respects reverently

Maintaining a good posture is important, as sitting or standing up straight communicates respect to others.

Step not on thresholds
Don’t lean on one leg
Ne restez pas assis avec les jambes au sommet de l'autre
Ne pas agiter votre fond

Nos actions et le langage corporel devrait également être approprié, de sorte que nous gagnons le respect des autres aussi bien.

Un bon exemple d'une personne qui a inspiré le respect de son comportement est Zhang Jiuling, un ministre Tang d'un grand charisme.

Le Respectable et Charismatique Zhang Jiuling

Zhang Jiuling (lingue) était un ministre de premier plan, poète et érudit de remarquée la dynastie des Tang, servant de Chancelier
(le plus haut fonctionnaire en Chine impériale) sous le règne de l'empereur Xuanzong.

Zhang est né à Qujiang dans la région Linnan. En tant que chancelier vertueux de l'ère Kaiyuan (l'âge d'or de la dynastie des Tang), Zhang avait le don de la prévoyance et la sagesse. He was also greatly respected for his loyal and forthright character—an ideal that was thereafter known as “the Qujiang Charisma.”

A statue of Zhang Jiuling, the famous, charismatic chancellor of the Tang Dynasty.

A statue of Zhang Jiuling, the famous, charismatic chancellor of the Tang Dynasty.

According to ancient Chinese historical texts, Zhang was “upright and gentle, with a well-groomed appearance”. No matter whether he was working in the office or relaxing at home, he was always neatly dressed. He always had an energetic and
sprightly stride, as well as an alert and sharp gaze.

To maintain a tidy appearance, Zhang invented a contraption that became a fashion trend. Ministers at the time carried a long, flat tablet called an wuban, which was used to transcribe notes and orders during meetings with the Emperor. The wuban was typically hung around the minister’s belt, but this made it look like the tobacco pouches often carried by villagers.

Zhang thought that this didn’t look very respectable, so he had a neater pouch made to hold his wuban. Whenever he went to meet the Emperor, Zhang would have his servant carry the pouch with the wuban behind him, so that Zhang could walk respectably without worrying about extraneous things around his waist. These protective pouches eventually became very popular, sparking a fashion trend during that time.

Zhang’s Charisma Impresses Emperor Xuanzong

Zhang was particularly favored by Emperor Xuanzong, who liked Zhang for his respectable demeanor, as well as for his energy and charisma. He would say to those around him, “Whenever I see Chancellor Zhang, my mind and spirit feel rejuvenated and energized.

Plus tard, when his ministers recommended candidates for the position of court official, Emperor Xuanzong would ask, “Is this candidate’s demeanor like Zhang Jiuling’s?” Clearly, Emperor Xuanzong considered Zhang the model standard for his choice of court officials.

But what truly impressed Emperor Xuanzong the most was Zhang’s shrewd foresight and his honest, forthright character.

Early in the Kaiyuan Era, a military general An Lushan was sent to the Emperor for failing to obey orders. Zhang advised Emperor Xuanzong to execute An as Tang military law, as he also suspected that An had the temperament to commit treason. But Emperor Xuanzong decided to spare the general’s life and keep him in the army.

Fidèle à la prédiction de Zhang, An Lushan plus tard trahi l'empereur Xuanzong en lançant An Lushan Rebellion, une série d'événements catastrophiques qui ont marqué le début du déclin de la dynastie des Tang.

L'empereur versait des larmes amères pour avoir ignoré les conseils de Zhang, et envoyé ses hommes à Qujiang pour commémorer Zhang. À partir de maintenant, Zhang a été appelé « Qujiang Gong », qui signifie que la personne la plus respectable Qujiang.

Read the full article here

Une côtelettes de fournisseur de viande de chien sur le marché Nanqiao à Yulin, dans le sud de la région du Guangxi en Chine en Juin 21, 2017.
festival de la viande de chien le plus célèbre de Chine a ouvert à Yulin sur Juin 21 avec les bouchers dalles de piratage de chiens et cuisiniers frire la chair suite de rumeurs que les autorités imposeraient une interdiction de cette année.(Becky Davis/AFP/Getty Images)Une côtelettes de fournisseur de viande de chien sur le marché Nanqiao à Yulin, dans le sud de la région du Guangxi en Chine en Juin 21, 2017.
festival de la viande de chien le plus célèbre de Chine a ouvert à Yulin sur Juin 21 avec les bouchers dalles de piratage de chiens et cuisiniers frire la chair suite de rumeurs que les autorités imposeraient une interdiction de cette année.(Becky Davis/AFP/Getty Images)

Yulin’s annual dog meat festival kicked off on Tuesday (June 21) with animal rights activists voicing their opposition and locals and visitors saying celebrations are low key this year.

But at a popular morning market, it was business as usual as vendors had dog meat on display for customers to choose.

“They are a lot, a lot of people who like (eating dog meat). It’s your habit, it’s my habit,” said Zhou, a dog meat vendor.

Many restaurants did not have the Chinese word for “dog meat” on display.

Vendors prepare dog meat at the Nanqiao market in Yulin, dans le sud de la région du Guangxi en Chine en Juin 21, 2017. (Becky Davis/AFP/Getty Images)

Vendors prepare dog meat at the Nanqiao market in Yulin, in China’s southern Guangxi region on June 21, 2017. (Becky Davis/AFP/Getty Images)

“Why won’t they (let us openly celebrate the festival)? The city government came out and told (the vendors) not to let restaurant owners sell (dog meat). The city government is always (handling this issue) this way. If there was no city government to mess with them then they of course could let the meat out,” said Ms. Min, a Yulin resident.

Animal activists were doing their best to save dogs from the pot.

“Dogs are man’s best, the most loyal friend. How could we eat our friends? You tell me,” said Yang Yuhua, an animal rights activist who flew from south-western Chongqing to purchase dogs sold at this year’s festival.

Dog meat is served at a restaurant in Yulin, dans le sud de la région du Guangxi en Chine en Juin 21, 2017.(Becky Davis/AFP/Getty Images)

Dog meat is served at a restaurant in Yulin, in China’s southern Guangxi region on June 21, 2017.(Becky Davis/AFP/Getty Images)

Yang spent over 1,000 yuan ($151.5) to buy two caged dogs at the market from the vendor.

Animal welfare NGO Humane Society International says that it has organised a petition against the festival which already garnered over 11 million signatures.

Read the full article here

Zhang Liang, one of the Three Heroes of the Early Han Dynasty, was known for his tolerance and respect for the elderly. (Catherine Chang/Epoch Times)Zhang Liang, one of the Three Heroes of the Early Han Dynasty, was known for his tolerance and respect for the elderly. (Catherine Chang/Epoch Times)

Trois classiques de caractère, ou San Zi Jing, est le plus connu du texte chinois classique pour les enfants. Écrit par Wang Yinlian (1223-1296) au cours de la dynastie des Song, il a été mémorisé par des générations de Chinois, jeunes et vieux. Jusqu'à ce que les années 1800, Trois classiques de caractère a été le premier texte que chaque enfant étudierait.

rythmique de texte, court, et simples vers trois caractères autorisés pour la lecture et la mémorisation facile. Cela a permis aux enfants d'apprendre les caractères communs, structures grammaticales, les leçons de l'histoire chinoise, et surtout comment se conduire.

It is said in the Three Character Classic:

He who is the son of a man
when he is young
should attach himself to his teachers and friends,
to learn propriety and decorum.

Xiang, at nine years of age,
could warm (his parents’) bed.
Filial piety towards parents,
is that to which we should hold fast.

Rong, at four years of age,
could yield the (plus gros) des poires.
To behave as a younger brother towards elders,
is one of the first things to know.

In the last two articles of this series, we learned about the challenging yet important role of parents in raising children.

But it takes two hands to clap, and children too must learn the challenging yet important duty of respecting one’s elders.

Respecting elders is deeply ingrained in Chinese culture. It takes many forms, including filial piety toward our parents, obedience toward our teachers, and deference toward senior citizens.

But why should we make the effort to respect to our elders? The following well-known folktale provides a compelling reason.

‘Come Back in Five Days!’

Zhang Liang (3rd century BC – 186 BC) was a brilliant military strategist from the Western Han Dynasty. His contributions enabled Liu Bang to unify China under the Han Dynasty, and he was known as one of the “Three Heroes of the early Han Dynasty.”

Selon la légende, les réalisations historiques de Zhang Liang n'aurait pas été possible sans sa grande tolérance et de respect envers un homme âgé.

Le respect des aînés exige que les vertus de la tolérance, la patience, sacrifice, et la maturité.

Un jour d'hiver, le jeune Zhang Liang marchait sur un pont quand il a vu un vieil homme debout à la tête du pont. Le vieil homme a jeté intentionnellement l'un de ses chaussures le pont, et ledit Zhang, "Garçon, chercher ma chaussure pour moi. »

Aussi étrange que cela était, Zhang n'a pas hésité alors qu'il marchait dans la rive du fleuve et récupéré la chaussure. Mais quand il a essayé de le faire passer la chaussure, le vieil homme a offert son pied à Zhang place. « Maintenant, me aider à mettre sur la chaussure," il a commandé.

En dépit des demandes inconsidérées de l'ancien homme, Zhang docilement et respectueusement obligé. Le vieil homme se mit à rire et dit:, "Mon garçon, vous êtes certainement la peine d'enseignement! En cinq jours, Attendez-moi ici au lever du jour « .

Cinq jours plus tard, tout comme le soleil furtivement à l'horizon, Zhang retourné au pont. Mais il a trouvé le vieil homme attend déjà. « Comment pouvez-vous garder vos aînés en attente?» Le vieil homme réprimandé. « Je vais vous donner une autre chance. Revenez dans cinq jours, et ne soyez pas en retard!"

Cinq jours plus tard, Zhang est arrivé à nouveau le pont avant que le soleil était. Pourtant, il a trouvé le vieil homme attend à nouveau pour lui. « Pourquoi êtes-vous encore en retard?» Le vieil homme fumee. « Revenez dans cinq jours!"

Cinq jours plus passé, et Zhang a aucune chance-il attendait déjà par le pont à minuit. Quelques minutes plus tard, le vieil homme est arrivé. Souriant, il a remis Zhang un livre. « Ce manuel est rare et précieuse. Je ne l'ai pas été en mesure de trouver un jeune propriétaire approprié pour lui jusqu'à présent. Fais-en bon usage!"

Le vieil homme se révèle être Huang Shigong, l'un des quatre légendaires sur le mont wisemen Shang, et le livre Zhang a reçu était un manuel La stratégie militaire précieuse art de la guerre par Taigong. Zhang a étudié le livre assidument et maîtrisé son contenu, éventuellement établir sa place dans l'histoire en tant que stratège militaire doué.

« Celui qui est le fils d'un homme, when he is young / should attach himself to his teachers and friends, d'apprendre la bienséance et le décorum « .

Nos aînés ont l'avantage d'années d'expérience et de la sagesse que nous devons respecter et apprendre. Une partie de leur expérience naît des erreurs qu'ils ont personnellement fait, et leurs connaissances peuvent nous protéger de faire les mêmes erreurs.

de plus, with their depth of experience and knowledge, our seniors are often able to identify the wheat from the chaff. The wise old man, who was testing Zhang’s tolerance and determination, saw that Zhang was far above the ordinary, hot-headed, lazy youth. Zhang’s admirable character made him confident that Zhang was the right person to impart his valuable knowledge to.

Le respect des aînés exige que les vertus de la tolérance, la patience, sacrifice, et la maturité. Like Zhang Liang, those who possess these virtues in abundance are equipped to go far in their lives.

Respecting Parents With Filial Piety

Xiang, at nine years of age, could warm (his parents’) bed. Filial piety towards parents, is that to which we should hold fast.

— Three Character Classic

All elders should be respected, but when it comes to one’s own parents, one is expected to go beyond fundamental obedience and show filial piety.

The Confucian philosopher Zeng Zi once said, “The body is given by the parents. How can we not be respectful with things given by our parents?” Our parents gave us life, and returning that gift with filial piety is our moral obligation.

Filial piety is such an essential virtue in Chinese culture that there is an entire Confucian text dedicated to it. People are expected to be filial to their parents, and those who do well are upheld as role models.

The Three Character Classic cites the example of Huang Xiang, who lived during the Eastern Han Dynasty. The young Xiang was known for caring dearly for his parents. After his mother passed away when he was nine, he was even more filial to his father, doing everything possible to make his father’s life easier.

According to Confucian belief, the virtue of filial piety goes beyond simply providing for one’s parents.

During the hot summer, Xiang savait que son père avait du mal à dormir à cause de la chaleur. Alors, tous les soirs avant que son père est allé au lit, il fan oreiller et tapis de son père pour les refroidir. En hiver, il se couchait dans le lit froid de son père pour le réchauffer pour son père.

L'histoire de Xiang est l'un des vingt-quatre dans le texte confucéen classique, Les vingt-quatre Filial Exemplars. Le texte contient également d'autres modèles de la piété filiale, tels que Wang Pou, dont la mère avait peur du bruit du tonnerre quand elle était encore vivant. Après sa mort, chaque fois que Wang a entendu le tonnerre, il se précipitait à sa tombe pour la réconforter.

Un autre exemple est Wu Meng, dont la famille était trop pauvre pour se permettre des moustiquaires. En tant que tel, pendant les nuits d'été, Wu se déshabiller et s'asseoir près des lits de ses parents pour permettre aux moustiques de se nourrir de lui, in the hope that they would not disturb his parents’ sleep.

According to Confucian belief, the virtue of filial piety goes beyond simply providing for one’s parents. It includes bringing honour to their names through one’s own accomplishments; showing love, respect and support; advising them kindly, including dissuading them from moral transgression; and honoring them after their deaths.

“It may be easy to provide food and money for the parents, but difficult to do so with respect. Even if it can be done with respect, it is difficult to do it naturally. Even if it can be done naturally, it is difficult to do it throughout one’s life. True lifelong filial piety is conducting oneself carefully even after one’s parents pass away, so that their names would not be tarnished,” said Zeng Zi, in the Classic of Rites.

Respecting Older Siblings

Rong, at four years of age, could yield the (plus gros) des poires. To behave as a younger brother towards elders, is one of the first things to know.

— Three Character Classic

Within the family unit, en plus d'être filial envers nos parents, nous devons aussi maintenir la parenté entre frères et sœurs.

Comme la plupart des gens, mon enfance ne fut pas sans combats avec mes frères et sœurs - plus de jouets, collations, les insultes, et échauffourées, entre autres. Mais combien d'entre nous se sont comportés ainsi que Kong Rong a fait quand il avait quatre ans?

Kong Rong était un homme politique et descendant de Confucius, qui a vécu à la fin de la dynastie des Han de l'Est (ap. J.-C.. 25-220). Grandir, Kong Rong avait plusieurs frères et sœurs plus âgés. Lorsque Kong Rong était quatre, sa famille a reçu un cadeau d'un panier de poires délicieuses, et son père lui gentiment demandé de venir et d'être le premier à choisir une poire du panier.

Kong Rong choisi rapidement la plus petite poire.

Son père a demandé, "Mon fils, Pourquoi avez-vous choisi cette petite poire et non un plus grand?"

Kong Rong a répondu, "Je suis le plus jeune, donc je devrais avoir la plus petite poire. Mes frères et sœurs sont plus âgés que moi, Ils doivent donc avoir les poires plus grandes « .

En dépit de son âge tendre, Kong Rong savait qu'il devait céder à ses aînés, y compris ses frères et sœurs plus âgés. Sa nature aimable et respectueux lui fit aimer beaucoup par sa famille.

Nous nous attendons souvent les frères et sœurs plus âgés aux soins pour les plus jeunes, mais les frères et sœurs plus jeunes devraient apprendre à respecter leurs frères et sœurs plus âgés. En ayant soin mutuel et la considération les uns des autres, frères et sœurs peuvent favoriser une culture pacifique et accueillant au sein de la maison.

Read the full article here
  • Tags:,
  • Author: <a href="http://www.theepochtimes.com/n3/author/jade-pearce/" rel="author">Jade Pearce</une>, The Epoch Times
  • Category: General

Le Premier ministre de Lu État, Ji Wenzi, était connu pour son sens de l'économie et de la conduite stricte, et a été profondément respecté par son peuple.Le Premier ministre de Lu État, Ji Wenzi, était connu pour son sens de l'économie et de la conduite stricte, et a été profondément respecté par son peuple.

The “Standards for Being a Good Student and Child” (Di Zi Gui) is a traditional Chinese textbook for children that teaches children morals and proper etiquette. It was written by Li Yuxiu in the Qing Dynasty, during the reign of Emperor Kang Xi (1661-1722). Dans cette série, we present some ancient Chinese stories that exemplify the valuable lessons taught in the third chapter of Di Zi Gui—”Caution in Daily Life.”

Il est dit dans le Di Zi Gui:

Rise early in the morning,
And sleep late at night.
Age comes quickly,
So treasure this hour.

When we realize that time is passing us by and cannot be turned back, we should especially treasure the present moment.

A good example of treasuring time in your youth is Che Yin (車胤), who served as a military general and later the Minister of Personnel (one of the nine ministries under the emperor in ancient China) during the Jin Dynasty.

Che Yin Studies Under the Light of Fireflies

Che Yin was one of the best-known scholars of the Eastern Jin dynasty, being remarkably wellread in various fields. He also had great character and strong language abilities, often making sharp observations and witty comments. En tant que tel, he was well-respected in the academic field, and also extremely popular. Che was often the life of the party, and people would lament his absence in any gathering.

Che’s knowledge and language abilities weren’t acquired overnight; as a young boy, he studied with complete dedication from day to night. Here is the story of how he studied under the light of fireflies, to extend his study time well into the night.

Che was born in Nanping, Fujian Province to a family of noble background. His grandfather had been the Prefect of Huiji, and his father served as secretary to one of the princesses.

From the young age of three, Che already showed himself to be thoughtful and polite, earning the praise of relatives who visited the family.

When Che turned five, his father taught him to read and write. Che was not only smart but extremely hardworking. He would be so absorbed in his studies that he would forget to eat or sleep, and not a day passed where he was not buried in a book. He would even stay up till midnight to study.

Che, bien sûr, needed a light to study at night, but after his father resigned from his job, the family lapsed into poverty and could no longer afford to buy oil for their lamps. Although his father worked as secretary for the princess, he was a very honest man and did not earn very much.

So when night fell, Che would feel sad that he couldn’t continue studying. But despite his young age, Che was also quite wise. He realized that he could maximize his learning by reading more books in the day, and reciting the books from memory at night.

One night, Che was sitting in the backyard feeling sorry that he could not study, when he noticed many fireflies around him. As the fireflies twinkled and glowed in the darkness, Che’s heavy heart immediately brightened as he struck upon an idea.

He constructed a makeshift net from a piece of old cloth and a bamboo pole, and began catching fireflies. But there were only a few fireflies in the backyard, which was hardly enough to create enough light. He caught a few more in the front yard, but there still weren’t enough.

Although it was already pitch dark, Che walked to a grass field outside his village, which was dotted with fireflies. Che had no difficulty catching a lot of them in a short time. When he got home, Che placed all his fireflies into a makeshift bag of silk netting, et suspendu au plafond. La lumière des lucioles pénétré dans les trous du sac, éclairer toute la pièce. Il était encore plus brillante qu'une lampe à huile! Che heureusement continué avec son étude.

Comme sa famille était trop pauvre pour se permettre l'huile de la lampe, Che Yin attrapé lucioles pour faire une lampe de fortune, afin qu'il puisse étudier la nuit.

Comme sa famille était trop pauvre pour se permettre l'huile de la lampe, Che Yin attrapé lucioles pour faire une lampe de fortune, afin qu'il puisse étudier la nuit.

De cette façon, Che a étudié dans la nuit tous les jours, et est devenu un érudit très savant. Depuis, L'histoire de Che d'utiliser lucioles pour étudier la nuit est devenu un conte chinois bien connu, et a donné lieu à l'idiome chinois 囊 萤 夜 读, qui décrivent quelqu'un qui étudie très dur.

Propreté Plus de luxe

Lorsqu'on se réfère à la façon dont on doit se comporter dans la vie quotidienne, Di Zi Gui emphasizes that tidiness and simplicity in one’s dressing is far more important than how “branded” one’s clothes look.

It is stated in the Di Zi Gui:

Clothes are valued for neatness
Not for extravagance
First follow your station
Second suit your family’s finances

The ancients always regarded frugality as one of the most noble virtues in daily life. Tidiness was meanwhile considered a reflection of one’s character, and a mark of respect for others. Such exemplars liked Zi Lu, a student of Confucius, and Prime Minister Ji Wenzi would explain why cleanliness and thrift were so important in their lives.

Zi Lu Reattaches his Hat Tassel Before Facing Death

Zi Lu (子路) was a student of Confucius and an official of the State of Wei. Despite his hot temper, he was a very upright person and was very careful about his appearance.

One year, internal chaos erupted in Wei State as rebels gained power and began conducting raids against those in the state administration. Upon hearing the news, many officials packed and fled overnight.

Despite being out of the country during the rebellion, Zi Lu chose to rush back to aid his country.

His peers tried to dissuade him from going back, saying that the situation was very dangerous and he would likely be killed if he did.

But Zi Lu replied “I receive a salary for serving my country. I cannot bring myself to run away at such a time.”

Zi Lu fought against the rebels with all his might, but was far outnumbered. Il a finalement été blessé par les rebelles et son pompon chapeau a été coupé. Sachant que la mort était imminente, Zi Lu rugit fort, "Arrêtez!» Abasourdi par le volume de son cri, ses agresseurs arrêtés.

Zi Lu dit alors, « Si je vais mourir, Je devrais au moins mourir d'une manière digne!» Calmement, il renouait son pompon chapeau à son chapeau, et face héroïquement sa mort et avec honneur.

L'histoire de courage inspirant Zi Lu face à la mort a été transmis à ce jour dans l'histoire chinoise.

Le Premier ministre Thrifty

Le Premier ministre Ji Wenzi (saison Ayako) est né dans une famille de trois générations de ministres. Il était un noble et célèbre diplomate de l'Etat de Lu pendant la période de printemps et d'automne, au service de son pays pendant plus de 30 années.

Ji Wenzi led a very simple and frugal life. He considered thrift to be the fundamental guiding rule for his conduct, and required his family to be as frugal as him. He dressed very simply but neatly, and besides the formal robes he wore in court, he did not have any other fancy clothes. Whenever he traveled for work, he would use a very plain-looking horse carriage.

Ji Wenzi dressed very simply but neatly.

One of his ministers, Zhongsun Ta, tried to persuade Ji: “You are the highest-ranking official, and command great respect. But I heard that you don’t allow your family to wear silk clothes at home, and you don’t feed your horses with good grain. You also don’t pay attention to the quality of your clothes. Wouldn’t this make you look shabby, and be a source of ridicule by our neighboring countries?

Le Premier ministre de Lu État, Ji Wenzi, était connu pour son sens de l'économie et de la conduite stricte, et a été profondément respecté par son peuple.

Le Premier ministre de Lu État, Ji Wenzi, était connu pour son sens de l'économie et de la conduite stricte, et a été profondément respecté par son peuple.

“This would also be detrimental to our country’s image, and people will gossip about how the Prime Minister of the Lu State lives in such a manner. Why doesn’t Your Honor change this way of life? Wouldn’t that be better for you and the country?"

Ji responded in a serious tone: “I, aussi, want my home to be decorated luxuriously and elegantly. But look at the people in our country. Many of them are still eating food that is too coarse to swallow, and are wearing clothes that are torn and shabby. There are also others who are cold and starving.

“When I think about these people, how can I still bear to indulge in material wealth? If I dress up my family and feed my horse on good grain—while my people can only afford to drink coarse tea and wear shabby clothes—how can I still have the conscience to serve my country?! de plus, I have heard that a country’s strength and glory is defined by the moral character of its civilians and officials, and not by how glamorous their wives look or how fine their horses are. How can I accept your suggestion?"

After hearing Ji’s words, Zhongsun was ashamed of his previous comments, but also had even more respect for Ji. À partir de maintenant, Zhongsun also followed Ji’s example in leading a simple life. He asked his family to wear clothes of ordinary cloth, and fed his horses with rough chaff and weeds.

When Ji Wenzi learned of Zhongsun’s change, he praised Zhongsun for being a moral person who could amend his mistakes immediately.

Read the full article here

‘’The Eighteen Scholars’’ by an anonymous Ming Dynasty artist. The painting depicts the eighteen erudite Confucian scholars gathered by Emperor Taizong of Tang, when he established the Institute of Literary Studies. (Domaine public)‘’The Eighteen Scholars’’ by an anonymous Ming Dynasty artist. The painting depicts the eighteen erudite Confucian scholars gathered by Emperor Taizong of Tang, when he established the Institute of Literary Studies. (Domaine public)

Trois classiques de caractère, ou San Zi Jing, est le plus connu du texte chinois classique pour les enfants. Écrit par Wang Yinlian (1223-1296) au cours de la dynastie des Song, il a été mémorisé par des générations de Chinois, jeunes et vieux. Jusqu'à ce que les années 1800, Trois classiques de caractère a été le premier texte que chaque enfant étudierait.

rythmique de texte, court, et simples vers trois caractères autorisés pour la lecture et la mémorisation facile. Cela a permis aux enfants d'apprendre les caractères communs, structures grammaticales, les leçons de l'histoire chinoise, et surtout comment se conduire.

It is said in the Three Character Classic:

To raise without teaching
is the father’s fault.
To teach without strictness
is the teacher’s laziness.

If the child does not learn,
this is not as it should be.
If he does not learn while young,
what will he be like when old?

If jade is not polished,
it cannot become a thing of use.
If a man does not learn,
he will not know the virtues of honesty and righteousness.

The ancient Chinese always had a thing about education—kids were expected to go to school (if it was within the family’s means) and to invest a good amount of time and effort in studying.

The Three Character Classic alludes to how important education was in ancient Chinese culture. “If the child does not learn, this is not as it should be. If he does not learn while young, what will he be like when old?” Education was not just an asset, but a mandatory part of a child’s development.

En particulier, education and schooling were considered essential for grooming a child’s values and character. “If jade is not polished, it cannot become a thing of use. If a man does not learn, he will not know the virtues of honesty and righteousness.”

Why did the ancient Chinese think this way? To understand why, one must realize that ancient Chinese education was rather different from our education system today.

Confucianism: the Core of Ancient Chinese Education

Our modern education system predominantly emphasizes the teaching of technical knowledge, including mathematics and science, language skills, and social studies.

En revanche, education in ancient China was largely based on Confucian classics. Depuis l'enfance, children spent their schooling time learning and memorising Confucian texts like the Great Learning, the Doctrine of the Mean, the Analects of Confucius , the Book of Odes, and of course, the Three Character Classic.

At the core of Confucianism are five cardinal virtues — benevolence, droiture, convenance, sagesse, faithfulness. Many values, such as loyalty, filial piety, courage, transparency, diligence, and so on are derived from it.

The teachings of Confucianism defined the moral standards for being a good person. They covered and effectively regulated the various strata of society, from the individual and the family unit, to society and the principles of governance.

Through the education system, Confucian values were imbued in children from a young age, and remained the backbone of education even at advanced, scholarly levels. En même temps, students developed their language skills and knowledge in social studies by studying these ancient texts.

This was the education standard for thousands of years, as dynasties rose and fell. With such wholesome and edifying core material, we now know why the ancient Chinese believed education was integral to a child’s moral development.

Enforcing Discipline in Education

To raise without teaching / is the father’s fault. To teach without strictness / is the teacher’s laziness.

— Three Character Classic

Bien sûr, it wasn’t enough to have good values and education material at hand. The people who delivered the material—the parents and teachers—were equally important.

There is an ancient Chinese fable about a child who was spoiled by his mother. Having lost his father at a young age, this child became the apple of his mother’s eye.

She indulged him so much that when he bullied other kids, she would never reproach him. When he stole from the neighbors, she would not return the things he stole.

As the child grew up, his petty misdemeanors escalated into serious crimes. He robbed and looted from others, and committed arson by burning people’s homes. Yet his mother still refused discipline him, and instead praised him for his felonious abilities.

finalement, the son was captured by the authorities, and sentenced to death.

Before being executed, the son requested to see his mother one last time. When his mother arrived, the son shed tears as he said to his mother, “I hate you, mother. This is entirely your fault. Quand j'étais jeune, you never taught or disciplined me for my wrongdoings. Maintenant, I don’t even have a second chance to turn over a new leaf…”

The son’s words broke his mother’s heart, as she realized it was true.

Teachers in ancient China were extremely strict, and even the youngest students were expected to sit properly and memories the assigned material without a single mistake.

As mind-numbingly dreary as this sounds, this method of teaching was actually quite effective. Premièrement, it tempered students to have excellent focus and endurance in studying. Deuxièmement, it ensured that the wisdom of the sages was deeply imprinted in their minds, such that they could easily draw upon it from memory for the rest of their lives.

By enforcing classroom discipline from a young age, the teachers ensured that the students had a solid foundation for learning, which would serve them well for many years to come.

Education: The Great Equalizer

Besides building moral character and training discipline, education was also the greatest equalizing force in ancient China. It enabled those born to the humblest backgrounds to rise to the highest levels in society – to become government officials, strategic advisers, physicians, artists, and poets.

The imperial examinations, which were established during the Sui and Tang Dynasty, were the main drivers for meritocracy and social mobility. Avant ça, important government roles were assigned purely by recommendation, and this went to those from rich and influential families.

But the imperial examinations were open to everyone and anyone, and they gave the general public an equal chance to enter a governing role. En fait, during the Ming Dynasty, sur 47 percent of candidates who passed the highest level of the examinations were from families with no official connections.

Because education was such an important ticket to a brighter future, those who did not have the opportunity to go to school greatly lamented their loss. One such person was a beggar named Wu Xun from the Qing Dynasty, who made his dream a reality for other underprivileged children.

Wu Xun’s father died when Wu was only five years old, and he and his mother begged to survive. But two years later Wu’s mother passed away as well, leaving Wu to fend for himself.

Wu supported himself by begging and doing odd jobs. While he didn’t mind the hardship, his greatest regret was that he didn’t have the opportunity to receive an education, like any other child. En tant que tel, he found it impossible to further himself and rise above his current status.

So Wu decided to set up a school for children of humble backgrounds, so that they would not suffer the same fate. Pour 30 years Wu raised funds by begged in the day and made rope to sell at night, and eventually managed to set up his school for underprivileged students.

The school proved extremely successful. Wu took an active interest in his students’ progress and was very respectful to the teachers. But whenever he saw teachers being lax or students being lazy, he would get on his knees and plead them to do their part. His sincerity inevitably moved the teachers and students to be more diligent, and no one dared to slacken.

Since ancient times, people have known the importance of education for one’s future. Even in our modern meritocratic society, people with good academic performance are given opportunities for social mobility. No matter how well one ultimately does, the chance to receive an education is something that should be treasured and never wasted.

Read the full article here
  • Tags:,
  • Author: <a href="http://www.theepochtimes.com/n3/author/jade-pearce/" rel="author">Jade Pearce</une>, The Epoch Times
  • Category: General

Mo Niang worked selflessly to protect her fellow villagers on the high seasMo Niang worked selflessly to protect her fellow villagers on the high seas

The “Standards for Being a Good Student and Child” (Di Zi Gui) is a traditional Chinese textbook for children that teaches children morals and proper etiquette. It was written by Li Yuxiu in the Qing Dynasty, during the reign of Emperor Kang Xi (1661-1722). Dans cette série, we present some ancient Chinese stories that exemplify the valuable lessons taught in the Di Zi Gui.

Treating Elders With Respect

It is written in the Di Zi Gui:

Rencontrant un ancien sur la route,
Approche et arc rapidement.
Si l'aîné est silencieux
Retreat et se tenir respectueusement.

Dizi décrit en Gui détail les façons de faire preuve de respect à ses aînés. En manger et boire, et à la marche et assis, nous devrions laisser la personne âgée aller d'abord. Quand un ancien appelle quelqu'un, nous devrions appeler immédiatement cette personne pour l'aîné.

Il ne faut pas s'asseoir quand nos aînés sont debout. Après avoir assis nos aînés vers le bas, nous pouvons nous asseoir que si on nous dit de le faire. Lorsque vous parlez à un aîné respecté, nous devrions parler à voix basse, mais il est également inappropriée si elle est trop faible pour être entendu. Nous devons servir nos nombreux anciens comme servir notre propre père.

La courtoisie et Bienveillance de Lord Xinling

lord Xinling (Xinling) was a prince of the State of Wei during the Warring States Period. The prince was very kind, generous and courteous to the elderly and to scholars. He was never remiss in his treatment of any of them, in spite of his wealth and rank, and always spoke with them courteously, regardless of their ability or achievements.

Par conséquent, many scholars from thousands of miles around sought his company and pledged their allegiance to him. Pendant ce temps, no other states dared to invade Wei due to Lord Xinling’s large pool of talented scholars.

There was a very talented seventy-year-old man called Hou Ying (侯嬴). He was very poor and—despite his age—worked as a guard at the city’s Eastern Gate. When Lord Xinling heard of him, he sent his subordinates to meet him with lavish gifts. Mais Hou a rejeté les dons courtoisement, en disant, « Je suis améliorais mon personnage depuis des années et l'intégrité de la pratique. Je ne peux pas accepter ces cadeaux juste à cause de mon mauvais état « .

lord Xinling. (Epoch Times)

lord Xinling. (Epoch Times)

En entendant cela, Lord Xinling a organisé un grand banquet à son domicile, et il a invité de nombreux invités importants. Lorsque tous les invités étaient assis, Lord Xinling partit avec sa voiture à cheval (avec le siège gauche vide et réservé pour Hou Ying) et son entourage à la porte de l'Est, d'inviter personnellement Hou.

Hou rangea son manteau vieux et usé, et monta dans la voiture en silence. Il était assis juste à côté de Lord Xinling et ne montrait aucun signe d'humilité ou d'humilité, en observant la réponse du Seigneur Xinling. Mais Lord Xinling était encore plus respectueux de Hou.

Hou Ying then asked Lord Xinling if he could take him to visit his friend at the slaughterhouse. Lord Xinling agreed with pleasure and drove him there immediately.

Hou Ying alighted from the carriage and greeted his friend Zhu Hai. He deliberately took his time with Zhu Hai while keeping an eye on the prince. But Lord Xinling’s expresssion appeared even more amiable.

By now, the prince’s entourage were seething with anger. Pendant ce temps, all the generals, ministers, and high-ranking officials had been waiting in the banquet hall for the opening of the feast. en outre, the people in the streets had seen Lord Xinling personally driving his carriage for Hou Ying. But when Hou noticed that Lord Xinling’s attitude had not changed one bit, he finally bid goodbye to his friend.

Quand ils sont arrivés au banquet, Lord Xinling a conduit Hou Ying à son siège à la table principale, et introduit et l'a fait l'éloge devant les invités. Les invités ont été grandement surpris par la loi de lord Xinling. Quand tout le monde buvait et se réjouissaient, le prince se leva et proposa un toast d'anniversaire à Hou.

Hou puis a saisi l'occasion de dire: « Aujourd'hui, je suis trop dur à Son Altesse. Je suis juste un gateman, mais Son Altesse a personnellement conduit sa voiture me chercher, et m'a accueilli devant tant de fonctionnaires. Je ne devrais pas avoir visité mon ami, mais il a accédé gracieusement à ma demande.

"Par conséquent, Je voulais renforcer Son Altesse réputation, c'est pourquoi j'ai délibérément fait attendre depuis longtemps. The visit was an excuse to observe how he would respond, but he was even more humble and respectful. Everyone on the streets regarded me as an impolite person, while recognising the Prince as a noble man who is courteous to the people!"

Après ça, Hou Ying became an important subordinate of Lord Xinling. Hou Ying also introduced Lord Xinling to Zhu Hai, who was a sage with great abilities. With the assistance of these two wise men, Lord Xinling became immortalized in Chinese history for defeating the Qin Army and temporarily saving the State of Wei and the neighboring State of Zhao. [[Hou Ying, who was too old to join his patron, instead pledged his loyalty and support by committing suicide on the day of the attack.]]

Regard Everyone as Family

It is written in the Di Zi Gui:

We are protected by the same heaven
And supported by the same earth

Dizi Gui teaches us to treat everyone like our own family. We should serve our elders as if we are serving our parents, and we should treat our peers as if they are our own siblings.

Here are a few touching stories from ancient China, about people who treated strangers like their own family.:

Du Huan Looks After Mrs. Chang

Du Huan was an official of the Ming dynasty. Du’s father had a good friend, Chang Yungong, who was a subordinate military official. But one day Chang died suddenly, and his family’s business investment failed soon thereafter. His surviving 60-year-old mother, Mrs Chang, was left penniless and homeless.

Through sheer chance, Du bumped into this poor lady. Mrs Chang had lost contact with her younger son for years, et malgré la recherche de ses parents pour l'aide, aucun d'entre eux ne la prendre dans. Donc Du décidé de la soutenir pour le moment, tout en aidant sa trace les allées et venues de son fils cadet.

Plus tard, Du bien réussi à localiser et contacter le fils de Mme Chang, le fils a refusé de prendre Mme Chang sous ses soins. Donc Du Huan a continué à s'occuper de la vieille femme avec une grande piété filiale, la traiter comme sa propre mère. Quand elle est décédée, Du Huan a acheté un cercueil et a tenu un enterrement d'enterrement pour elle. Par la suite, il a même visité et nettoyé sa tombe chaque année.

Ma Zu, Déesse de la mer

Il y avait une femme appelée Lin Mo, qui vivait dans la province de Fujian pendant la dynastie des Song du Nord. Selon la légende, elle n'a jamais pleuré de la naissance jusqu'à ce qu'elle était d'un mois. Par conséquent, elle a été aussi appelé Mo Niang (Mo Niang), ou Maiden silencieux.

Mo Niang’s father and brother were fishermen. Un jour, their ship was wrecked in a terrible disaster. With Mo Niang and everyone else’s effort, her father was saved, but her brother was lost at sea.

To prevent this tragedy from happening to others, Mo Niang often risked her life to rescue ships in distress.

Une seul fois, her fellow villagers were getting ready to go out to sea. Because Mo Niang was able to read signs of impending weather change, she could tell that a huge storm was coming, and she begged the villagers not to go.

To Mo Niang’s despair, the villagers persisted in going out to sea, as they had to feed their families. Néanmoins, she asked them to steer their ship in the direction of light, if they met with a storm.

True to her prediction, a huge, raging storm sprang up, which rendered all the light beacons and navigation markers ineffective. À ce moment là, Mo Niang bravely lit her house on fire. The huge blaze lit up the sea with brightness, and guided the villagers to land. Due to her great love and compassion, the villagers escaped from being drowned.

Mo Niang worked herself to exhaustion to protect those at sea. Sadly, her dedication took its toll, and she died prematurely at 28.

In remembrance of Mo Niang, the Chinese people have built temples honoring her along the coastline, and refer to her as Ma Zu, the Goddess of Sea.

Read the full article here

Image illustrant les Chinois courant jour dit qui décrit un jeune couple uni qui vivent avec bonheur même dans la pauvreté avec le terme « monter ensemble dans une voiture conduite par le cerf ». (Internet photo)Image illustrant les Chinois courant jour dit qui décrit un jeune couple uni qui vivent avec bonheur même dans la pauvreté avec le terme « monter ensemble dans une voiture conduite par le cerf ». (Internet photo)

Bao Xuan venait d'une famille pauvre au cours de la dynastie des Han occidentaux, 2000 il y a des années. Son mentor apprécié ses hautes valeurs morales, et que sa fille se marier Shaojun Bao, en les dotant d'une dot magnifique.

Une excellente femme

Bao a dit à son épouse: « Vous êtes né dans une famille riche et sont utilisés à des ornements de luxe. Mais je suis pauvre, Je ne pouvais pas accepter ces cadeaux riches « .

Son épouse a répondu: « Mon père a vu que vous avez prêté attention à cultiver la bonne conduite et la vertu, leader simple, la vie Thrifty, ainsi il m'a laissé vous marier afin que je puisse vous servir. Comme je suis ta femme maintenant, Je vais vous obéir « .

Bao Xuan se mit à rire joyeusement: « Si vous pouviez penser de cette façon c'est mon souhait. »

Shaojun rangea toutes ses robes de luxe et des ornements et des vêtements simples passe à, équitation au village avec Bao dans une calèche tirée par les cerfs.

Après avoir salué sa mère-frère, Shaojun a immédiatement commencé les tâches ménagères, l'exercice du devoir d'une fille-mère. Comme une excellente femme, avec son mari, Le nom de Shaojun a également été enregistré dans le livre d'histoire de la dynastie des Han.

Les gens de nos jours en Chine décrivent un jeune couple uni qui vivent avec bonheur même dans la pauvreté avec le terme « monter ensemble dans une voiture conduite par le cerf ».

Une rencontre magique

Bao Xuan a été recommandé par la suite de devenir un agent du gouvernement.

Une fois sur le chemin de la capitale, Bao a rencontré un savant qui accourait seul sur la route. Le savant avait soudainement une crise cardiaque. Bao a essayé de l'aider, mais n'a pas pu sauver l'homme qui est mort rapidement.

Bao ne connaissait pas le nom du savant, mais vu qu'il portait un livre de rouleaux de soie blanche avec dix pièces d'argent. Bao a utilisé une pièce d'argent pour organiser l'enterrement du savant, placé le reste de l'argent sous la tête, et le livre des rouleaux de soie sur le ventre.

Après avoir dit des prières, Bao Xuan a parlé dans la tombe du savant: « Si votre âme peut encore travailler, vous devriez laisser votre famille savoir que vous inhumées ici. J'ai maintenant d'autres fonctions pour assister à, Je ne peux pas rester plus longtemps. » Il a fait ses adieux et continua son voyage.

En arrivant à la capitale, Bao Xuan a remarqué un cheval blanc qui le suivait. Le cheval ne permettrait pas à tout le monde, mais Bao se rapprocher de lui. Il ne laissait personne nourrir d'autre le. Ainsi, Bao a adopté le cheval.

Après Bao a terminé sa mission dans la capitale, il est monté cette maison de cheval blanc mais a été perdu sur le chemin. Il a vu la résidence du marquis. Comme il faisait sombre, il est allé avant de demander l'hébergement. Il a présenté sa carte de visite au maître de la famille.

Le serviteur qui a vu le cheval avec Bao à la porte rapporté au marquis: « Ce client a volé notre cheval ».

Le marquis dit: « Bao Xuan est un homme de bonne réputation. Il doit y avoir raison. Ne dites pas les choses non fondées « .

Le marquis a demandé Bao: « Comment avez-vous obtenu ce cheval? Il avait l'habitude d'être la nôtre et nous ne savons pas pourquoi il a disparu. »

Bao a dit en détail son expérience avec le savant et sa crise cardiaque. Le marquis a été choqué: « Ce savant, il était mon fils!"

Le marquis récupéré le cercueil de son fils. Quand il ouvrit, il a vu l'argent et le rouleau de soie blanche, tout comme il pose Bao décrit.

La source: « Biographies des exemplaires femmes » en « Livre de la dernière Han » ou « Histoire de la suite Han » un document judiciaire chinois couvrant les années de 6 à 189 UN D..

"Lie Yi Zhuan", un roman écrit par Cao Pi, l'empereur Cao Wei de.

Sous la direction de Damian Robin.

Lire la suite

Read the full article here

Cangjie a été envoyé à la Chine du ciel pour créer l'écriture chinoise, il est né avec quatre yeux. Ce portrait de Cangjie est une peinture du 18ème siècle a eu lieu à la Bibliothèque nationale de France. (Domaine public, image combinaison compilée par Epoch Times)Cangjie a été envoyé à la Chine du ciel pour créer l'écriture chinoise, il est né avec quatre yeux. Ce portrait de Cangjie est une peinture du 18ème siècle a eu lieu à la Bibliothèque nationale de France. (Domaine public, image combinaison compilée par Epoch Times)

Le caractère chinois 滅 (ma) signifie éliminer, éteindre, ou détruire. Au sein de ce caractère, l'ancienne philosophie chinoise des éléments de l'univers sont en jeu.

Le caractère 滅 est formé avec trois parties: feu d'incendie, 戌 une arme, et le radical de la 氵 latérale gauche qui représente l'eau.

Xu (tendance) est un personnage complet par lui-même, ce qui signifie une sorte d'arme longue poignée, mais il est également utilisé dans le calendrier traditionnel chinois, représentant le onzième des douze branches terrestres, correspondant à l'élément terre.

Dans "Shuowen Jiezi", le début du 2ème siècle dictionnaire chinois de la dynastie Han, le feu est décrit comme le Yang Qi le plus fort (dans la culture chinoise on croit que Qi est une forme d'énergie), mais il peut être engloutie par 戌 - terre.

Dans l'interaction entre le radical 氵 et les personnages 火 et 戌, l'eau éteint le feu, donne le feu (ré-)naissance à la terre, tandis que la terre peut embraser le feu.

Dans os Oracle Script, la plus ancienne écriture chinoise ancienne, 戌 a été écrit comme indiqué ci-dessous:

hache

Ne pas ressembler à une hache d'incendie utilisé par les pompiers d'aujourd'hui? Ainsi, le caractère entier 滅 est comme un moteur de feu bien équipé.

Dans le caractère simplifié « 灭 » utilisé en Chine continentale, l'eau et la hache d'incendie ont disparu, il n'y a qu'un trait horizontal sur le dessus du feu. Espérons que les installations de lutte contre l'incendie dans les casernes de pompiers sur la partie continentale ne sont pas aussi été simplifiées!

Comme l'un des cinq éléments, le radical 氵, avec trois gouttes d'eau, est dans l'usage courant. Lorsque vous le voyez dans le cadre d'un caractère, vous pouvez deviner qu'il est lié à des concepts ou qui coule comme l'eau tels que: torrent torrent, Soluble à l'état fondu, 活 vivant, océan, plage plage, swimming, bain de bain, la pollution de la pollution, Nettoyage de nettoyage, rivière rivière, 湖 lac, Les larmes larmes, sueur Sweat, 深 profonde, peu profonde peu profonde, 油 huile ...

However, lorsque l'eau devient de la glace, glace, au lieu de trois gouttes,Rui , le radical latéral de gauche a été réduite à deux gouttes, 冫, que l'eau est moins apte à l'écoulement.

D'autres personnages avec deux gouttes d'eau comprennent: 冬 hiver, 寒冷 froid, 凍 congelé, flétrie flétrie, 凄 un sentiment de refroidissement désolée ...

On dit que Cangjie, la personne qui a créé l'écriture chinoise 5,000 il y a des années, est né avec quatre yeux. Cela a conduit à son observation plus profonde du monde naturel, ses créatures, et processus, et à son discerner la vérité en perçant à travers les profondeurs de même les plus grands mystères.

Sous la direction de Damian Robin.

Lire la suite

Read the full article here
  • Tags:, ,
  • Author: <a href="http://www.theepochtimes.com/n3/author/joyce-lo/" rel="author">Joyce</une>, <a href="http://www.theepochtimes.com/" title="Epoch Times" rel="publisher">Epoch Times</une> et <a href="http://www.theepochtimes.com/n3/author/zhu-li/" rel="author">Zhu Li</une>, <a href="http://www.theepochtimes.com/" title="Epoch Times" rel="publisher">Epoch Times</une>
  • Category: General

Kou Zhun a vécu une vie frugale en dépit d'être un premier ministre. Quand il est tombé une fois dans l'indulgence, il a été ému aux larmes et a rapidement changé ses voies après avoir lu un poème laissé par sa mère avant sa mort. (SM Yang / La Grande Époque)Kou Zhun a vécu une vie frugale en dépit d'être un premier ministre. Quand il est tombé une fois dans l'indulgence, il a été ému aux larmes et a rapidement changé ses voies après avoir lu un poème laissé par sa mère avant sa mort. (SM Yang / La Grande Époque)

Trois classiques de caractère, ou San Zi Jing, est le plus connu du texte chinois classique pour les enfants. Écrit par Wang Yinlian (1223-1296) au cours de la dynastie des Song, il a été mémorisé par des générations de Chinois, jeunes et vieux. Jusqu'à ce que les années 1800, Trois classiques de caractère a été le premier texte que chaque enfant étudierait.

rythmique de texte, court, et simples vers trois caractères autorisés pour la lecture et la mémorisation facile. Cela a permis aux enfants d'apprendre les caractères communs, structures grammaticales, les leçons de l'histoire chinoise, et surtout comment se conduire.

However, après la Révolution culturelle en Chine, le classique de trois caractères a été interdit et a fini par tomber en désuétude. Dans cette série, nous faire revivre et revue ce grand classique chinois, en tirant les leçons anciennes de la sagesse pour nos vies modernes.

Les trois caractères classiques de toute première leçon découle d'une croyance philosophique du savant confucéen Mencius, et qui a été repris par d'autres philosophes comme Jean-Jacques Rousseau et Emmanuel Kant:

Les gens à la naissance
Sont bonnes par nature.
Leurs natures sont les mêmes,
Mais leurs habitudes deviennent très différentes.

En d'autres termes, les gens sont nés bien naturellement. Par conséquent, leur nature sont très similaires au début. Les jeunes bébés et les bambins peuvent varier dans leur personnalité, mais en gros, ils partagent nature même de l'innocence et la pureté que nous ne partageons pas les adultes dans son ensemble.

However, que nous grandissons dans différents milieux de vie et sont influencés par diverses personnes et expériences, nous développons des priorités et des habitudes qui nous poussent de plus en plus à part.

Certains d'entre nous apprendre à valoriser la famille et la piété filiale avec la plus haute importance; d'autres apprennent à valoriser le travail et les finances au-dessus de toutes les autres. Certains la satisfaction de trouver dans la vie par le matériel satisfaisant veut; d'autres à trouver un sens à la recherche spirituelle.

L'anecdote réelle suivant illustre comment deux vieux amis ont grandi et développé des personnalités et des valeurs très différentes dans la vie:

Contexte même, Les valeurs différentes

Un écrivain chinois raconte comment son père, Jing, était respectueux, gentil, et honnête homme, qui a travaillé comme charpentier dans un village en Chine. Son bon caractère lui a fait bien aimé par tout le monde.

Jing avait un ancien camarade de classe nommé Wang, qu'il était de bons amis avec. Un jour, Wang Jing a invité plus à sa maison pour le dîner et des boissons.

Comme ils ont consommé de l'alcool et le chat, Jing a remarqué un homme âgé, qui ressemblait à un serviteur, leur apportant du thé et du vin et la cuisson des aliments pour eux.

Il a donc demandé à Wang, « Qui est cet homme âgé?» Wang a répondu, 'C'est mon père.'

Jing était foudroyée. Il a sauté immédiatement et dit à l'homme âgé, "Oncle, s'il vous plaît vous asseoir. » Il a aidé l'homme dans son siège, puis lui versa un verre de vin et dit, "Oncle, S'il vous plaît pardonnez ma grossièreté « .

Jing puis se tourna vers Wang et dit, « Je ne suis plus votre ami. Vous ne savez pas comment respecter vos aînés. » Il a pris ses outils et sortit. Wang a essayé de dire quelque chose, mais Jing était déjà parti.

Jing avait appris d'un jeune âge qu'il faut toujours être respectueux envers ses aînés et les enseignants. Wang, d'autre part, n'a pas appris à prendre ce principe au cœur. En dépit d'être de vieux amis et de plus en plus dans le même village, à la fois Jing et Wang avaient développé des caractères très différents - dont l'un était meilleur que l'autre.

Kou Zhun reçoit une leçon Au-delà du Grave

Alors qu'est-ce qui rend une personne devenir comme Jing au lieu de Wang? La réponse se trouve dans la strophe suivante du trois caractères classique:

Si bêtement il n'y a pas d'enseignement,
T
il va se détériorer la nature.
La bonne façon dans l'enseignement
Est d'attacher la plus grande importance à la rigueur.

est maintenue bonne nature innée Une personne par l'enseignement et l'orientation tout au long de la vie. sans conseils, toutefois, cette bonne nature peut devenir corrompu.

Un bon exemple est l'histoire de Kou Zhun, un premier ministre qui a vécu pendant Song du Nord de la Chine Dynasty.

Kou est né dans une famille d'intellectuels. However, Le père de Kou est mort quand Kou était jeune, et il a été élevé par sa mère seule main, qui a tissé tissu pour les aider à obtenir par.

En dépit de leur pauvreté et la misère, La mère de Kou Zhun lui a appris et l'a exhorté à travailler dur, de sorte qu'il pourrait un jour faire de grandes contributions à la société.

Kou avéré être extrêmement intelligent, et il ne déçoit pas sa mère. À 18, il a passé l'examen national avec des résultats exceptionnels. Il était donc parmi les quelques chanceux d'être choisi par l'empereur pour devenir un fonctionnaire du gouvernement.

La bonne diffusion de nouvelles à la mère de Kou, qui était gravement malade au moment. Avant de mourir, La mère de Kou a donné un fidèle serviteur d'un tableau qu'elle avait fait.

« Kou Zhun deviendra un jour un fonctionnaire du gouvernement," elle a chuchoté. « Si son personnage commence à se égarer, donner cette peinture lui « .

trempe Extravagance

Kou Zhun finalement a gravi les échelons pour devenir Premier ministre, mais la gloire et le luxe ont commencé à se rendre à sa tête. Et pour montrer sa richesse et de statut, il a décidé d'organiser une fête d'anniversaire extravagante, rempli avec des performances de banquet et d'opéra.

Sentant que le temps était venu, le serviteur présenté Kou avec la peinture de sa mère. Quand elle a ouvert Kou, il a vu un tableau de lui-même en lisant un livre sous une lampe à huile, avec son tissu de tissage de la mère à ses côtés.

Écrit à côté de la peinture ont été les mots:

Regarder vous endurez les difficultés d'étudier sous une lumière faible,
J'espère que vous devenez une meilleure personne et profiter beaucoup d'autres à l'avenir.
Votre mère vous a enseigné adorant la vertu de Thrift;
Dans les temps de la richesse future, ne jamais oublier ceux qui sont pauvres, comme nous étions autrefois.

Kou Zhun lire encore et encore les paroles de sa mère, puis fondit en larmes. Il était clair hors de tout doute qu'il n'a pas été à la hauteur des attentes de sa mère. Il a demandé à ses invités de quitter et renvoya sur le banquet.

Merci au rappel opportun de la mère de Kou delà de la tombe, Kou a été acceptée à partir d'une spirale descendante en direction de l'avidité et la corruption. À partir de maintenant, Kou a vécu frugalement, d'autres traités généreusement, et exercé ses fonctions officielles avec haute moralité et de l'intégrité. Il a fini par devenir l'un des plus célèbres et les plus aimés Premiers ministres de la dynastie des Song.

Cette histoire réconfortante montre non seulement que l'orientation et l'enseignement sont nécessaires pour toiletter un de caractère, mais le conte porte aussi un message plus profond - parce que les gens sont bien naturellement, même ceux dont les personnages sont passés peuvent égarer redécouvrir leur bonne nature, et revenir à leur origine, vraiment bons mêmes.

Un exemple célèbre est l'histoire de Zhou Chu, un scélérat qui a terrorisé son village pendant des décennies. En réalisant l'erreur de ses voies, il se retourna et a aidé son village slay deux monstres - un tigre et un dragon - qui avait frappé le village depuis des années.

Tant que nous nous rendons compte de nos erreurs et nous sommes déterminés à changer, il est jamais trop tard pour devenir une personne encore mieux.

Read the full article here

Cangjie a été envoyé à la Chine du ciel pour créer l'écriture chinoise, il est né avec quatre yeux. Ce portrait de Cangjie est une peinture du 18ème siècle a eu lieu à la Bibliothèque nationale de France. (Domaine public, image combinaison compilée par Epoch Times)Cangjie a été envoyé à la Chine du ciel pour créer l'écriture chinoise, il est né avec quatre yeux. Ce portrait de Cangjie est une peinture du 18ème siècle a eu lieu à la Bibliothèque nationale de France. (Domaine public, image combinaison compilée par Epoch Times)

Une ville chinoise de Chong Qing âgé de 38 ans a rencontré Cangjie dans son rêve. Cangjie lui a enseigné l'art de literomancy, ou déchiffrer les caractères chinois. Literomancy, une forme de cartomancie, a été utilisé pour la voyance depuis les temps anciens.

Selon Sound of Hope Broadcasting, l'homme chinois, appelé San Mu, a dit qu'il rêvait d'une grande figure âgée aux cheveux blancs et une longue barbe.

La personne âgée a tenu San dans la paume de sa main et a demandé: "Me connaissez-vous?» San secoua la tête: "Non". La personne âgée a dit: « Je suis Cangjie qui a créé les personnages. Permettez-moi de vous apprendre à déchiffrer un ».

Le caractère Cangjie enseigné San était 爆 (sac), ce qui signifie exploser.

Les deux côtés gauche et droit de 爆 sont des personnages pleins. Sur la gauche est 火, le feu qui signifie, et sur la droite est 暴 qui porte la prononciation de BaO et un moyen violent ou brutal.

La partie principale du caractère se trouve à droite, violent, et lui-même contient trois caractères complets dans la partie supérieure, milieu, et les parties inférieures. Elles sont: jour, qui se réfère au soleil, tout, des moyens communs, et 水, eau.

L'une au milieu, tout, est une abréviation de 中共 qui fait référence au Parti communiste chinois (CCP).

San rappelle comment Cangjie a expliqué le plein caractère de 爆:

Cangjie a tiré le caractère dans l'air d'abord, puis dit: « Les gens ne doivent pas être associés au PCC. Vous marchez en avant avec elle, vous aurez brûlé par le feu; vous allez vers le haut avec elle, vous serez brûlé à mort par le soleil; vous sautez vers le bas avec elle, vous serez noyé « .

Il a continué: « Seulement quand vous vous désolidariser Aurez-vous une chance de survie, comprendre?» Après Cangjie disparu.

En Chine, la plupart des gens doivent se joindre au PCC, soit en tant que jeunes pionniers dès qu'ils atteignent les enfants d'âge scolaire sont invités à porter un foulard rouge et engagent régulièrement leur loyauté envers le Parti sous le drapeau rouge chaque jour et / ou dans la Ligue des jeunes communistes quand ils atteignent l'adolescence.

Les universités sont des motifs actifs pour le recrutement des membres du PCC, souvent sous le camouflage de recevoir un honneur. En tant que membre du Parti est le seul canal pour obtenir des postes gouvernementaux.

Ce qui est étrange est que, bien que les communistes athées, tous ceux qui se joint à des organisations du PCC doit déclarer un serment de foi, consacrant sa vie au Parti.

Cette lecture de literomancy de 爆 correspond à l'interprétation du mouvement Tuidang en Chine.

Tuidang signifie littéralement en retraite du Parti. Grâce à renoncer officiellement à leur association avec les organisations du PCC, les gens annulent leurs engagements passés ou leurs accords avec le PCC (s'ils ont fait leurs engagements à leur insu ou ont été séduites en eux).

Le nombre de Chinois qui ont dissociées du Parti est immense.

Comme l'un des cinq éléments, feu, le caractère pour le feu, est également utilisée par radical. Quand tu le vois, vous devinez que le mot est lié au feu. Tels que 煉 affiner la recherche, four à four, la lumière de la lampe, frire Fry, charbon de charbon, cendre grise, 煙 fumée, combustion brûlant, brillant brillant, 火災 catastrophe incendie, et 滅 éliminer ...

Pouvez-vous trouver où le feu est dans le dernier caractère, détruire ? Ceci est également un personnage intéressant. Nous allons écrire au sujet de la prochaine fois.

Sous la direction de Damian Robin

Lire la suite

Read the full article here
  • Tags:, ,
  • Author: <a href="http://www.theepochtimes.com/n3/author/joyce-lo/" rel="author">Joyce</une>, <a href="http://www.theepochtimes.com/" title="Epoch Times" rel="publisher">Epoch Times</une> et <a href="http://www.theepochtimes.com/n3/author/zhu-li/" rel="author">Zhu Li</une>, <a href="http://www.theepochtimes.com/" title="Epoch Times" rel="publisher">Epoch Times</une>
  • Category: General